1933

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by lonewolf, Sep 10, 2008.

  1. lonewolf

    lonewolf Senior Registered

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    If this brings tears to your eyes . . . better yet, if it makes you sob . . . then you remember the Great Depression.

    Sometimes the most painful times bring out the greatest beauty.



    Lonewolf
     
  2. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    HI Lonewolf,


    DO you have memories regarding the Great Depression? Care to share? Did you post the memories elsewhere?
     
  3. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    I'd be curious to hear about your experiences, too, Lonewolf. :)


    Here is an old thread about 1930's memories/fascination.


    Karoliina
     
  4. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    Hi Lonewolf,


    Nice to hear from you.


    Sounds like quite a tale... I look forward to hearing it...


    I used to wag school (play truant) to stay home and watch 1930s musicals, because they just filled me with such inexplicable feelings... I didn't know why back then, but now I do... It was a strange feeling of homesickness and nostalgia, even though (obviously) I wasn't born yet.


    It makes sense to me now of course, because those were some of my happiest times. :)


    in that rather sad life.


    T.
     
  5. Florence

    Florence Senior Registered

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    Maybe I shouldn't admit it....but I have fond memories of the 30's.....I was born in 1933....grin


    I lived with my mother and 4 older sisters in a rather poor neighborhood. (I never knew that then)


    Sister Monie (Monica) and I were great tomboys. There were mostly boys in our neighborhood to play with. Cops and Robbers, Cowboys and Indians, Marbles, Hop Scotch, Tree climbing etc. We didn't have much but neither did anyone else. W used clothes pins for guns and airplanes My sister and I had 1 pair of roller skates and she would use one and me the other. We used them like a scooter. The boys cut up innertubes and made rubber band guns and used oranges crates from the grocery store and a 2 x 4 ....put a roller skate front and back, added handles and Whalla....They had a homemade scooter.


    A piece of bread with sugar on it was a treat. Candy was 1 penny and a "Guess What" was 2 cents


    Bread and milk were delivered by horse drawn wagons. The milk man used to put the feedbag on his horse right at our house and I would pet him and feed him grass.


    Those were the years of The Lone Ranger, The Green Hornet, The Shadow (only the shadow knows) Intersactum (sp.?) The radio announcer would say "Turn out the lights!! Turn them ALL out" We would and we would all squeeze together on the couch and listen to the frightening stories. At the end, my big sisters would say "Florencie....turn the lights back on..and I would be too scared to move. Ha Ha ...so we would sit there until 2 of us would go together to light the lamps again. We did it every week...so crazy...Monie and I would copy our older sisters and walk around with books balanced on our heads. Sitting down and getting up without having the books fall off. My sisters got that from watching the movies in those days. I learned to dance by standing on my sister Shirley's feet. She was 19 and I was 6. I loved those days and those memories and the 40's, with the exception of practice air raids and black outs, was also a great time with the music industry....Frank Sinatra, Frankie Laine, and Mario Lanza to name a few.


    I still have records from that time and of course


    CD's etc.


    I guess because my mother was a person with a good disposition and a big laugher,,,,we girls all came out the same. The O'Donoghue girls.....


    So you see to me....those were The Happy Days
     
  6. wednesday

    wednesday Senior Registered

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    Thanks for the story Florence. I love to hear stories like that. My mom was born in 1941 but never talks much about it. My favorite aunt, he sister, was also born in 1933, but she never talked about her childhood either, so its a treat to hear childhood stories from that era.
     
  7. Florence

    Florence Senior Registered

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    Hi Wednesday....I'm glad you enjoyed that retelling of my childhood. We had a few other people that stand out in my mind at 7 years of age. We had a Pony man who came every summer a couple of times. He would take your picture sitting on the pony for 25 cents. At days end he would ask who had a fenced yard where he could leave his pony for the night and someone would always come foreward. We had a large community yard with no fence....so we couldn't do it.


    The other guy was the Waffle Man. He came almost every evening in the sumer. You could smell the wonderful sweet smell of his waffles long before he arrived. Waffles were large with 4 sections. A whole one was 20 cents. My mother would sometimes buy Monie and I each i/4 for 5 cents each. It was covered with powdered sugar.....If you were richer than my mother....you could get a waffle with ice cream...like a sandwich. His wagon was drawn by a horse and he had a big bell that he rang. It looked very much like the ones you see at a Fair that sell Elephant Ears.


    The war was terrible...but like so many things in life...there were also comical moments. A lot of item were hard to get and every family was given a book of stamps for certain things. Sugar, coffee, pineapple, gas...You could only buy coffee if you had a coffee stamp. One of the other items was silk stockings. I don't think you needed a stamp for them but they were impossible to find and people stood in long lines to buy them if they found any at all. Well, some smart fella developed a liquid that you rubbed on your legs to look like stockings. When it dried you took this beauty pencil and ran a line down the back of you leg so it would look like the seam that real silk stockings had. So...2 of my older sisters, Betty who was 20 and Dolores who was 18 dressed up in thier best summer white dresses with matching white heels and walked 1 1/2 blocks to the bus stop to wait for a bus. Suddenly it started to rain.


    All I remember is two girls coming into the house screaming and crying and my mother falling over in laughter. There they were....all sopping wet, hair stuck to their faces and their new stockings had run down their legs in rivers and all over their white shoes. Later, of course, they both agreed it was funny...but at the time it was a real tragedy.


    Movies were 10 cents on Saturday for children. You saw 2 movies with cartoons and a News Reel in between. You also were given a free Comic book at the door. If I went with my mother during the War years ...they would give you a plate or bowl with each ticket you bought. In the middle of the show...they would turn on the lights and men would come through and pass baskets to collect money for the March of Dimes in the fight for a cure for Polio. Every evening the paper would list how many people had died or had gone into an Iron Lung having contracted Polio. I can still see the picture that was posted in the lobby at the show......It was a close up of a very good looking sailor. He held his finger to his lips to signify ssshhhhhhh. Beneath it said "A slip of the lip......can sink a ship" All letters were read by a third party and arrived with many parts having been cut out because they may have contained information about where a soldier or sailer was at that time. Everything was secret....


    Your Aunt must remember some of those things...ask her.....
     
  8. Steely

    Steely New Member

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    Wonderful stories,so familiar but so far away from the year I was born.I love ice cream on waffles,not the waffle cones but real waffles.
     
  9. wrinkle

    wrinkle New Member

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    Florence, those were really the happy days! Very cool stories. My mother was born 1934. She must have similar ones.
     
  10. michaldembinski

    michaldembinski Senior Registered

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    How wonderful! This has brought back immediate memories of PL flashbacks brought on through watching 1930s and 1940s B&W movies late at night on BBC2 as a teenager in the 1970s. I'd creep downstairs when my family was all asleep to watch Busby Berkeley musicals, screwball comedies or tense films noirs. The period clicked with me totally - that sense of familiarity, identical to being confronted with one's own current-life memories.


    My 1930s PL memories are of Kentucky, farm, open air, poverty (though not desperate poverty), sunshine, bubblegum cards, soda pop, movies, early fascination with machinery (bicycles, motorbikes, cars, trucks, aircraft, trains). A happy time.
     
  11. Karoliina

    Karoliina Moderator Emerita

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    I agree. Even if I don't have many detailed PL memories of this specific decade, in general I feel it was a very happy time despite the Great Depression in my PL's. (Besides I was fortunate and young enough not having to worry about it too much.)


    Karoliina
     
  12. lonewolf

    lonewolf Senior Registered

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    Hard Times


    Anyone else have the feeling in 2009 . . . I've been through this before, I can do it again? And now isn't nearly as hard as it was then?



    Lonewolf
     
  13. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    I love that song, Lonewolf :D Eastmountainsouth does an amazing version that makes me jump right up and sing along....
     
  14. Alexnovo

    Alexnovo Senior Registered

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    Lonewolf: First thanks for the link to the song. Very nice. As to your question, it made me think and remember several things. In this life, I graduated from High School in 1980. Anyone who remembers that time can tell you that it was a period of troubling economic news (not as bad as the current news, but pretty bad.) At that time, I had a definite connection with the 1929 crash and in 1980, I wrote a short story called the "Class of 1929." The short story, which I remember as not being very good from a literary point of view, was about a person, who had lived in a time of plenty, the 20s, and just as he was becoming an adult, everything crashed. The Character then was reborn only to repeat the cycle, living through the 70s and seeing things turn down again.


    I had not thought about this episode until I read your post. When I was a teen in 1980, to me reincarnation was just something I thought of as part of science fiction. Now that I am older I wonder if there was a deeper past live memory present in this. In my current meditations, I am coming to understand that I live during the 10s, 20s and 30s in Argentina. The visions I get from the earlier period all imply a fairly comfortable middle class life style. I seem to have an adverse reaction when I look forward into the 30s, but the images I do get of my later years, imply a serious downturn in my economic situation. What I know about Argentine history of that period is that the Depression had serious consequences in this country. Argentina went from being one of the wealthiest nations on Earth with a stable well functioning (if imperfect) democracy to being a place of extreme economic and political upheaval from which it took 50 years to recover (some would say it still hasn't recovered).


    Thus while there is a part of me that says, yes I have been through this before, there is also a part of me that is less willing to say, "I survived it then, I can do it again."


    Indeed, while my soul clearly survived it, I am not sure my prior life did. While I remain unclear about this, my regressions suggest that I was born around 1900 or so and was dead by the early 1940s. I am not saying the Depression was the cause of that death, I am just saying that I for whatever reason, I do not think I made it through.
     
  15. Ginger_Mandrake

    Ginger_Mandrake Ever Confused

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    That type of music doesn't *quite* do to me what music such as this:

    , from around the same time period, does. I have been obsessed with this type of music since I was about 14.
     
  16. stardis

    stardis Senior Registered

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    Although, I was not born (in this lifetime) until 1952, I feel that I may have lived in the 30's also. A memory that I have is one of owning a parcel of land upon which I built a small home and outbuildings where I kept animals and raised bees. I was somewhat self-sufficient and the the place was like heaven on earth to me -- I loved my life there. I was a fairly young man when I built this place and lived there many years. I remember a whitewashed building where I processed honey and that was important to me for some reason. I had not thought about this until now but in this lifetime, I was interested in beekeeping when I was a teenager and I took beekeeping classes with an old gentleman and became a certified apiarist (although I am not a beekeeper).


    I also remember driving past the ruins of this same place when I was maybe in my 70's. I was driving an old pickup truck and it was perhaps a 1937 truck. The old homestead had burned down.The place had decayed and become so overgrown that evidence of habitation was difficult to see.


    I have for a good part of my life looked for this place everywhere I go and on television documentaries or still photos. I am always looking for this place. I used to think that it was in Colorado for some unknown reason -- I grew up there mostly. I don't have any reason to think that was the place though. Perhaps it is not a country road anymore and I would never recognize it.


    My mother was born in 1933. I find it interesting that I may have been an old man when she was a young girl. Today, my mother was telling me about an incident when she was 5 years old (1938) when her grandfather's associates came visiting from Chicago -- they were gangsters -- and they gave her some money and told her to go the grocery and buy them some pastries. She didn't know where the store was and got lost -- someone brought her back home.


    From my mother's stories, the 30's didn't sound like a good time to be around. Yet, from my limited memory of that era life was pretty good. It seems strange to me that I could have been an old man living pretty well when my mother was a small child living in less than desirable circumstances. Does anybody else feel strange about overlapping lifetimes?


    My best friends are in their late 70's and 80's. I like classical music best, but listen to Sting while on the computer. I sometimes feel like I have a foot in two different eras.
     
  17. Hey_Jude

    Hey_Jude Gelfling

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    Gingy! I meeesed you, thanks for the link to some of my favorite music!


    Stardis, sometimes I hear stories from family members about tha time period and it sounds scary and dangerous, but then I hear stories from other family members that make the 'olden days' seem appealing. Many of my relatives probably spent their days hanging with gangsters and drinking bootleg hooch, but some spent their time out in the country 'homesteading'. I'd rather be beekeeping than making moonshine in the bathtub.
     
  18. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    HI Stardis,


    I am interested in hearing more about this - if you care to share. There is a happiness I feel from your post...

     

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