22 Month Old Fear of Hunger?

Discussion in 'Children's Past Lives -Age 7 & under' started by QCLMom, Jul 17, 2012.

  1. QCLMom

    QCLMom New Member

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    Hello, everyone. I'm a new member here, and I have been trying to find other experiences similar to what I am going through with my son, "Finn," who is 22 months old now.

    For the past month, Finn has woken up at 4AM almost every morning saying that he's hungry. This, in itself, is not at all unusual, as you'll see from the subsequent paragraphs describing his previous eating and sleeping habits. What's unusual is that he seems mildly obsessed with making sure that he has food available to him when he goes to sleep and wakes up in the middle of the night, even if he doesn't eat any of it. It's like he just want to know that's it's there, like it's a security blanket or something. As soon as we finish his bedtime routine (bath, snack, brush teeth, books & nursing), he immediately starts saying, "eat! eat!" with genuine distress, as if we regularly send him to bed hungry. I assure him that of course we'll get him something to eat, that Daddy has made a waffle for him, and that he can eat that with Daddy upstairs in bed. (I then hand him off to Daddy, who has already toasted the aforementioned waffle.) This reassurance (and of course, the appearance of the actual waffle) always calms him down, even though my husband reports that Finn often only takes a nibble or two of the waffle, if he takes any at all.

    Finn then wakes up each night around 4AM screaming for Mommy. When I go over to him and try to pat him back down, he is always insistent that he's hungry, signing "Eat" and also, more recently, saying, "Eat! Eat! Eat!" I always cuddle with him, show him the waffle and water that we keep next to the bed, but it's often not until I pick him up and walk him downstairs to the actual kitchen and pop the waffle back into the toaster oven for a few seconds that he'll calm down. When we walk back upstairs with the food, he will, once again, sometimes eat half of the waffle, but more often than not, won't eat any at all even though he was proclaiming only minutes before how hungry he was. In the last two weeks, what I'll call these "hunger nightmares" have become more "verbal." On separate occasions, I have now caught him signing "Eat" while still asleep, saying "eat, eat, eat" while still asleep, and also saying "all gone. all gone. all gone." while sleeping.

    If we had ever, EVER withheld food from him in any way, I would, perhaps, understand this behavior in the context of his current collection of experiences, but we have always been incredibly responsive (and more often than not, anticipatory) in terms of his hunger cues. I'm hypoglycemic, so I'm perhaps hyper-aware of how low blood sugar can affect mood and energy levels. As a result, we always carry snacks around with us, both for Mommy and Finn. If he's cranky or his behavior changes quickly, I have always offered him something to eat to see if he's hungry. (If he is, great, but if not, I certainly don't push the food.) I have always nursed on demand and, aside from some rules about nursing locations now that he's a toddler, still basically do.

    Could any of this be related to something traumatic in a past life? Finn has always been a truly horrible sleeper, which is why we coslept from the beginning. When your baby nurses around the clock and only sleeps in 45 minute increments, you have to cosleep to survive! He has had terrible nightmares almost since we brought him home, and honestly, because he was 6 weeks early and spent 10 days in the NICU, I always attributed his nightmares to that. (Even though we stayed with him as much as the hospital would allow, I'm sure that the hospital-imposed feeding schedule of every 3 hours was tough on him, and being without us for 6 hours at night probably contributed to his acute separation anxiety. Still, could 10 days in the NICU manifest itself in a nighttime food obsession at 22 months?)

    I should mention that Finn has this fixation with food availability only at night. During the day, it seems that he's perfectly confident that he will be fed whenever he needs to be. If it's at all relevant, we also didn't force any type of nighttime weaning. About two months ago, we simply talked about how nursing was going to sleep at night and would wake back up when the sun came up, and he took to it beautifully, with no tears. (And that's saying A LOT, because Finn is a very persistent, vocal, high-needs kind of kid. For him not to cry about something is nothing short of a miracle.)

    So has anyone heard of anything like this? I have read Carol's first book, but I don't remember it addressing anything in a child this young who wasn't speaking in longer sentences yet.
     
  2. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior Registered

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    Hi QCLMom, and welcome to the Forum!


    Although I have no personal experience with this kind of thing, I hope that one of our more experienced members will reply to you regarding your child's obsession with food at night. Certainly you have come to the right place, because we tend to support the theory that very young children share some memory of their past lives. It is important that you have read the first of Carol's two books, and I think that you will gain even more insight by reading her second book. I would also recommend reading as much as you can about the research done by Dr. Ian Stevenson. In addition, you may find Dr. Brian Weiss's books to be valuable in understanding how fears and phobias can be caused by past-life experience.
     
  3. ChrisR

    ChrisR Administrator Emeritus Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi QCLMom, welcome to the forum :)


    I'm sorry to here about your son's anxieties, and I hope that you find the help here that you seek.


    Actually, your son's problem is not entirely uncommon. I have read about certain people's issues with eating and food being related to starvation in a past life, holocaust victims are one example.


    I'm glad that you've found Carol's book, and I hope that it helps you to understand that your son will get through this. You can also email Carol if you want to. I'm sure others will be able to give you some good advice too.


    Let us know how you get on :)


    Chris
     
  4. Cryscat

    Cryscat Senior Member

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    Welcome QCLMom. You've gotten good advice for future reading. I have a feeling that you won't get any clues until he starts verbalizing better. I would continue to reassure him that food is available. Best luck to you.
     
  5. LifePurpose

    LifePurpose New Member

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    Greetings, QCLMom -


    As a mom myself, my knee-jerk reaction would be to first look at things from a physiological perspective.


    I'm sure you've already considered the following questions of course, being his mom, but in case you haven't:


    how is your son's growth in terms of percentile? Is he in the normal range? What foods is he eating regularly? Is his diet diverse enough? Does he have any bowel/digestive issues (i.e. stomach cramps, constipation, diarrhea, etc)? And lastly, have you talked to your pediatrician about the night time incidences with regards to food?


    Just things to consider, which I'm sure you already have, but i thought i'd throw them out there.


    I wish you the best of luck in finding some sort of resolution to your son's nighttime discomfort.
     
  6. Blueheart

    Blueheart Senior Member

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    I am sorry that your family is going through a rough time right now. The only assurance I can give you is this. No one else knows your child the way you do. If your gut tells you that Finn's fear of hunger is related to a past life, then it is. Sadly, it is not so rare, even today, for children to die of hunger.


    My daughter Emily had a fear of water pop up out of the blue when she was two. I think these things often appear when milestones, such as a similar age, are reached.


    I would suggest that you just keep doing what you are doing. If you see him signing "all gone" in his sleep again, I would softly tell him that in this life Mommy will make sure he has plenty of healthy food to eat, whenever he wants it.
     
  7. Mama2HRB

    Mama2HRB Senior member

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    Perhaps putting some snacks in his room where he can reach them (hopefully healthy ones) will show him that he does not have to worry in this lifetime.


    So very sad.


    I have a snake phobia in this life, and have had many nightmares of being swallowed alive by a snake. Even touching a snake held by a handler did not help. I will literally run to the other side of the road to get away from a dead, totally smashed one on the road.
     
  8. Lady2

    Lady2 Senior Registered

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    Welcome to the forum QCLMom! Glad you have joined us, and are open minding in considering the source of your sons fears. I don't know if there is much you can do now other then continue to comfort him and make sure he knows he will not have to go without, at least until he gets a little older and perhaps begins talking about his past lives. Keep a sharp eye & ear out for when this starts (usually around 3-4 years old). :thumbsup:
     
  9. tltfaas

    tltfaas New Member

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    A Suggestion


    Hi,


    Sylvia Browne said something in a book about a young child having what seemed to be past life nightmares that was disrupting the entire family's sleep. She said that once you're sure the child is soundly asleep, quietly to their bedside and whisper into their ear something like this. "Finn, you are no longer starving, you have plenty of food to eat. You are remembering a past life and you no longer have to suffer as you did in that life. You can let go of your fear now and live in the present." She said when the child is asleep you will be speaking to their higher self. This higher self will absorb and understand the comforting message you give him.


    Just a thought...


    Bonnie
     

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