Have you ever heard of the "Mandela Effect?"

Discussion in 'Parapsychology' started by Jody, Jan 3, 2017.

  1. Jaimie

    Jaimie Senior Member

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    I'm just thinking this and hope I don't offend anyone. I think all those names that we think spell differently is because of a fault in our human brain, so to speak, that is all. it is no mystery. if it was about alternative parallel universe, that fate has changed into 2 different realities (which I think is the aim idea of the Mandela effect?? But I could be wrong??) then I don't think it would have to do with any errors in spelling.
     
  2. landsend

    landsend Senior Registered

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    I've heard folks talk about this before, and think the most simple answer is probably the correct one. Human error. It reminds me of when I was a kid and eating a chocolate bar (candy for Americans) and then one moment later it was gone from my hand, not on the sofa, no where to be seen. Little me thought someone had stolen it, or it had disappeared into space and time. Most simple explanation is I was enjoying it so much that I didn't realise I'd finished it and wanted another.

    I also thought it was spelt 'Dilemna' but then I'm mildly dyslexic so don't ask me, I can spell the same word different in any body of text.
     
  3. KenJ

    KenJ Assistant Archivist and Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    The link you provided sounds like someone who just wanted to create a video. I did however enjoy learning about Georgia -
     
  4. Stewardess Ester Ősz

    Stewardess Ester Ősz Senior Member

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    I had an experience with the Mandela effect over a year ago on a short holyday day trip with a friend of mine. We stated talking about cold war history, and how the cold war ended during the 80's, as Reagan and Gorbachev came to the power on each side of the cold war. We were both lifting up Gorbachev, who we both thought had been doing an exelent job to end the dictatorship in the Soviet Union, despite of the strong forces in his party being against him. And we also talked about how we both were sad because Gorbachev had passed away some years ago. We both remembered very well his death being announced on national news. That they said he had passed very silently and quickly in his home after a short time of illness, and that he didnt want to meet any friends of his nor any journalists, since a few mounts before passing.

    Then some days later, when I was back home, I read about Gorbachev on the Wikipedia that he is not dead at all but very much alive. I dont have to say I was very surprised by that, remembering his death announced on the news so clearly. I imediatly phoned my friend from my holyday, to tell her about this. And she was also very confused and surprised, as she remembered the news of his death just the same way as I.
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2019
  5. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    Personally I put it down to human error. I can think of lots of minor examples of people I know who go through their entire lives mispronouncing certain words, and though I never see how they spell those words, it is likely they would spell it as they speak.

    I think when we encounter words in print, we can easily skip by these discrepancies, it is only when we are first learning to read that we focus on each individual letter, after a while we see the group of letters together and just see that as a word.

    There is also this, we really don't care much about order of letters.
    https://www.sciencealert.com/word-jumble-meme-first-last-letters-cambridge-typoglycaemia

    I know from my own experience that I'm prone to errors, sometimes comparing memories with family members when reminiscing, there are often discrepancies, or simply blanks, each person recalls particular details which are outside the awareness of another.

    This takes us to a different but related area. Interviewing witnesses to some crime or incident. The accounts given by several people may contain significant differences, even contradictions. It doesn't seem feasible that the event really did occur differently for each person, much more probable that witness testimony is unreliable. This has relevance in the legal system, where even the most honest and sincere witness may give an erroneous description of what occurred.
     
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  6. inhaltslos

    inhaltslos Moderator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I've never heard of this and find it very interesting! Most of the things are, I believe, just human error...(but, Ed McMahon didn't do anything with Publisher's Clearinghouse? Seriously?? I don't remember him carrying big checks and champagne to a lucky winner's door, but I can hear him saying the phrase 'Publisher's Clearinghouse' and being their spokesman plain as day in my head. Curious.)
    I had something like this happen at our house just about a month ago. My wife and I were watching Finding Neverland, which I thought I had seen before and disliked. Afterwards, I realized I was getting this movie confused with another one we had watched about Louis Carroll some years ago in Argentina. I had made a few comments about getting these movies confused, and my wife finally turned to me and asked what the heck I was talking about...we had NEVER watched a movie about Carroll. I thought she was mistaken, and I told her about specific scenes, where we had watched it, etc. Turns out this never happened and that this movie does not exist. We couldn't even find a similar documentary.

    Later, during that same week in fact, I brought up a Nazi documentary with a very specific name that had just come out. After trying to find it to show someone, I was never able to find it again on the same site and had also disappeared completely when Googling it.

    Idk what was up with me that week! :rolleyes:
     
  7. Cryscat

    Cryscat Senior Member

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    Here is a question that I always ask now:

    Why is it that all of the "Mandela effect" memories tend to involve people NOT OF that culture, country, business or area of interest?

    I happen to have some online friends from all over the world, and so far, I have found the following to be true: NONE of my friends in South Africa remember Mandela dying in prison. NONE of my friends in China remember the tank man being run over. NONE of my Australian friends think that New Zealand is on a different place on the map.
    NONE of my friends who are obsessed about cinema and film think that the title of the Anne Rice Film was "Interview with A Vampire"

    Now why do you think this is? Do you see a pattern here? Could it be that those who are most prone to misremember are those who are more far-removed from the topic in question?
     
  8. Speedwell

    Speedwell Senior Registered

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    A fair question.

    Sometimes I find things frustrating. For example I have ancestry in a non-English-speaking country. I've openly stated this to my friends a number of times over the years, and named the specific country. Yet I can be pretty sure that many of them if asked would get the name of that country wrong. One of them even highlighted (as a favour to me) some festival of traditions from some other unrelated country - because he sincerely believed that was my ancestry.

    What I've learned from this is that even after giving the correct information, repeatedly, over a period of years, people will still have in their own minds something quite different. But it does share the idea that the subject under consideration is somewhere distant or unfamiliar, not something encountered all day, every day.
     
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  9. Runner

    Runner Member

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    I think that it is possible that the Mandela effect is an example of the healing hand of God. Even the Bible has quite a bunch of verses that people remember differently yet when they look it up it is different. For example a common memory is that after the Last Supper when Jesus was praying, he told his disciples to sleep now because of the long day of crucifixion ahead. But every printed version of the Bible says that Jesus told off the disciples for falling asleep.

    The real way of healing damages is only to replace the relevant time frames. After God has completed that, the material reality and people's memories would mismatch, I think.

    There is also a relocated tree in Swizerland which nobody has seen but it is in every photo.
     

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