How do I deal with emotional past life burden?

Discussion in 'Reincarnation Questions' started by Dana, Sep 15, 2019.

  1. Dana

    Dana A Nazi Soldier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2019
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    Philippines
    It's not easy to deal with a past life involved in war. I was part of the Nazi war machine, and it's not easy to accept that fact, I certainly have killed innocent people, and I'm not comfortable with that either. How do you guys deal with that burden, especially if you fought for the most evil regime in history, or at least any similar wars?

    Right now, I'm trying my best to heal from this. I just try to put my mind on other things because I can't always be distracted by my emotions regarding this.

    My friend suggested that I should tell this to my Philosophy professor since she has knowledge about reincarnation, but I'm nervous about that, even though she is open minded about this.
     
    Souldier, Jaimie, KenJ and 1 other person like this.
  2. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    570
    Location:
    England
    It's a difficult one, Dana. A lot of us were soldiers doing a job, in the defence of our country as we saw it. A lot of us had no involvement in the evils of the regime, and a lot of us knew nothing about the death camps. But inevitably, in war, we killed innocent people. I find killing of any sort hard to deal with, but it happened and we can't change it. All we can do is learn from it. I've always felt guilty, but I vowed in this life never deliberately to kill any living creature, and I've stuck to that (much to my own inconvenience at times).

    If you feel your Philosophy professor is open to reincarnation, what's there to lose in talking to her? It could make for a very interesting discussion, and she might have ideas to help you, perhaps.
     
  3. Dana

    Dana A Nazi Soldier

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2019
    Messages:
    28
    Likes Received:
    35
    Location:
    Philippines
    Well, I talked to her. It kinda felt weird at first but then she gave me some advice. My friends were trying to comfort after that, because I was at the verge of breaking down.

    "Live in the present and learn from the past. If you dwell on the past, it will just hurt you every time you think about it."
     
    fireflydancing and tanker like this.
  4. tanker

    tanker Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2018
    Messages:
    513
    Likes Received:
    570
    Location:
    England
    Well done, Dana. That must have been hard to do, and I'm sorry it affected you afterwards, but I think it's a positive step forwards. I hope you find the advice helpful.
     
    Dana and KenJ like this.
  5. Li-la

    Li-la Senior Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2019
    Messages:
    167
    Likes Received:
    124
    I was not a soldier but a nurse assistant during WW1 placed in Egypt at one point, a life that only came to surface during meditation. I only remember little bits. The soldiers suffer so much, on both sides. People forced out in war. You had no choice. If you would not have gone out in duty, guess what would have happened to you? Don't beat yourself up about it. Please take care.

    Best Wishes
    Li La
     
    Dana likes this.
  6. Klaud

    Klaud Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jan 14, 2019
    Messages:
    170
    Likes Received:
    182
    Location:
    USA
    Taking someone's life tends to stick with you. I did have a lifetime where I very intentionally killed a lot of people.

    The best thing I can tell you is to accept that it happened and to try to move forward. If you're genuinely sorry for what happened and trying to be better, that's about all you really can do.
     
    fireflydancing and Spirit Sword like this.
  7. DearlittleMaria

    DearlittleMaria Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2019
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    12
    I have found that accepting that what you did in the past doesn't define who you are. I never did anything bad personally in the past but I am still haunted by my death and anxiety induced what if questions. It doesn't get easy but if you ever need to talk I am.
     
  8. Eva1942

    Eva1942 A Walking Enigma..

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Messages:
    263
    Likes Received:
    169
    Location:
    Australia
    I ask my guides sometimes “when will it stop hurting? I just want it to stop hurting!” They tell me that while it will still hurt for a while, the more I accept what happened and in particular my memories, the less it WILL stop hurting.

    There are some things from WWII that used to hurt whenever I read or looked at them. I’d feel wildly hurt because of what people said. I’d get angry. Now, I care little for other’s opinions because like I said in your other thread, if I know the truth and what is right deep in my heart then what does it matter?

    Laughter is the best medicine. Truly.

    Eva x
     
    Dana likes this.
  9. coral

    coral Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2018
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    11
    In the PL I remember I wasn't a soldier but I have a great deal of pain for soldiers because most of the time they were young men forced to join the army. Those men wanted to have normal lives, married, have children. And then what? A political note says all men have to go to wars, fighting for obscure reasons, killing young men like them just because the political stated that they were the enemy. Most of the soldiers in WW1 didn't understand why the were fighting, and why the war was so long. They were not prepared for this new kind of war, away from the battlefields, were civilians are targets. The WW2 was even worse, using civilians as targets both from the Germany side but English bombs killed a lot of French people living in the North of France, there, people hated English as much as they hated German, because it was the British bombs that dropped on the city and killed French innocents. American nuclear bombs killed thousands of lives in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The politics are the true responsible for all those tragedies, not the soldiers who, for most of them, thought they fight the good cause but are lied about the real motives of a war.
    If it doesn't change the fact that it's a man's hand which holds the gun, the mental manipulation of soldiers by the political establishment is the first killer and the one that is never trial and never feel any remorse.

    It's just my insight but to help you deal with that, do you know the reasons why your were in the army? Did you went freely or was it required by your social environment? (family, schools, etc) You probably don't have the answer but just raising the question is important because it put things into perspective : was it a real choice or a social pressure? Remember that young children were enrolled into Nazi propaganda from a very young age, parents were forced to send their children into those Nazi education center. Emotional manipulation is very strong and politcal systems can use it very well, especilly the dictatorial one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2019
    Dana and tanker like this.
  10. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,024
    Likes Received:
    728
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    Hi Dana,

    I feel a lot of compassion for the soldiers that fought bravely on behalf of Germany. Most were, I believe, just ordinary patriotic young men trying to serve their country and convinced by the powers and press of the day that their cause was just and their deaths and sacrifices necessary and noble. So it goes. There is and always has been a lot of evil in this world. I do not know how often I may have done the same things, but I doubt any of us have escaped doing wrong in this or a similar way.

    However, I do admire those who saw through the propaganda and risked their lives for truth. So, if you do not know her, I'm going to introduce you to Sophie Scholl and the "White Rose". (A good summary is here: https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/the-white-rose-a-lesson-in-dissent). You can find out a lot more about her and the others of the White Rose who died fighting for the right inside WWII Germany in Wikipedia and elsewhere, but she and they are an example that I would hope to emulate if I found myself in their position. I don't know that I ever have or every could do what they did and die as bravely, but their example inspires me nonetheless. Perhaps as a young person it will do the same for you.

    [​IMG]

    Cordially,
    S&S
     
  11. SeaAndSky

    SeaAndSky Senior Registered

    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2014
    Messages:
    1,024
    Likes Received:
    728
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    I think this quote from the article cited above is worth setting forth, as it speaks to the dual nature of all people and all peoples, Germany as well as other nations:

    "In the vogue words of the time, the Scholls and their friends represented the “other” Germany, the land of poets and thinkers, in contrast to the Germany that was reverting to barbarism and trying to take the world with it. What they were and what they did would have been “other” in any society at any time. What they did transcended the easy division of good-German/bad-German and lifted them above the nationalism of time-bound events. Their actions made them enduring symbols of the struggle, universal and timeless, for the freedom of the human spirit wherever and whenever it is threatened."

    The choice is with us all. I pray that I can make the choice they made and died for if I am called to do so.

    S&S
     
    Dana likes this.
  12. Spirit Sword

    Spirit Sword Senior Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2018
    Messages:
    270
    Likes Received:
    331
    Dana, you are not alone in this struggle. There are many "warrior souls" on this forum and all of us have dealt with some degree of what you are feeling.

    I have been dealing with past life memories for years now and each new lifetime brings more pain and guilt. Currently I am a very violence-adverse person, (it is not that I disagree with anyone ever using violence, but I tend to avoid it myself from a sense of empathy). This means that realizing all of my past lives were somehow involved in war or violent crime was particularly difficult to grapple with. Worse still was discovering that my reasoning was very rarely something altruistic such as fighting for the rights of the oppressed; usually I was looking for glory or personal revenge. I was horrified to come across one lifetime where my first reaction to anyone being a mild annoyance was, "Is this person important enough that if I stab them, others' fear of me will not be enough to stop them from giving me trouble over it?" to which the answer was usually no. Sometimes it was consequences of my actions that brought me guilt, such as realizing that if I had not existed, an entire country would not have been subjected to several centuries of military dictatorship.

    The way I see it, you have two options: you can run towards the trouble or run away from it.

    You can pretend that reincarnation does not exist and that you did not once do some things that you are currently not proud of. Good luck if you select this option. From what I have seen, few people go back to being "normal" after experiencing past life memories.

    My advice would be firstly to think about the nature of reincarnation: is it reasonable to have guilt over something you did in a past life? The present you did not do whatever it is you happen to be ashamed of. From a logical standpoint, it makes even less sense to feel guilty about the failings of a previous incarnation than it does to beat one's self up about mistakes they made as a child. It made sense to you then, but you did not have the same perspective that you do now. There is nothing you can do to change it.

    This is easy to think but much harder to believe. Which is why I would actually suggest attempting to learn more about your Nazi lifetime. Do take it slow, as trying to force memories can create false ones or open you up to overwhelming information. It may take a while to get to anything that does not inspire more guilt, but you will eventually find something in that life which explains why you were that way, or something that proves you were not entirely bad.

    I hated that past life persona that lorded fear over others and harmed people who disagreed with him. I practically disowned him and used third-person pronouns to discuss him in situations where I would have used "I" if I had been describing any other lifetime. That is, until I came across my best friend in that lifetime. He was one of the kindest people I have ever seen and it was clear that the two of us were very close. If someone such as that was so fond of me, clearly I was more than an uncontrollable ball of rage. Or in the case of that lifetime where I somewhat accidentally helped create a dictatorship, there was more to the story that I was not considering. First of all, I learned of my mistake during that lifetime, as the man I put into power immediately tried to have me killed (and eventually succeeded). But my death put a black mark on his record. While he should have been a figure of peerless reputation as the father of a new regime often is made to be, the poets recalled him mostly as the man who killed Spirit Sword. These realizations helped me to recognize that while I was a flawed person, and still am, I was more complex than a single flaw, and that the effects of my actions were not as succinct as I was making them. Basically, a person can have good and bad traits and can make good and bad decisions leading to good and bad legacies. It's easy to put someone into a single category with limited evidence, but when your experience with a lifetime is wider your understanding of it will become much more nuanced.

    Most importantly though, the past is over with. The best thing we can do is to take what lessons we can from it and move on.
     
    Eva1942, Dana and tanker like this.
  13. BellonaStrandt

    BellonaStrandt Armageddon

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2016
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    40
    Killing innocent people is normal for us, in terms of lessons. I don’t know about you but for me, it’s a mandatory lesson. I have done that in many lives so I’m honestly more concerned that I’m not guilty at all. I also worked for Nazi Germany but to me, it was like fulfilling a duty not to the regime but to the country. From my perspective, I felt that I was in service for Deutschland.

    One thing you need to note is that I did kill the ‘undesirable’ people during the earlier part of my career but I begged my superiors that I didn’t want to be involved in this anymore. I wasn’t doing it out of sympathy or anything because I didn’t really care but I felt that it was wasteful to make a polyglot like me into a killing machine when I was better off as a spy. Come on, besides German, I was also fluent in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Dutch, Norwegian, Czech and Russian. Do you know how ridiculous it is for someone who can speak so many languages to kill people when he could be involved in espionage instead? That was my frustration back then. I was used to being a murderer anyway. Currently, whether I support violence or not, it depends on the situation. Sometimes, it is the answer if other means to solve the situation fail.

    To me, Nazi Germany wasn’t the most evil regime. It’s evil, yes, but not the worst. During the 20th century, there’s other very evil regimes, worse than Nazi Germany. They made us Germans look like boy scouts(not angels though). Be glad that at least we didn’t torture people in public or anything. Not saying that using gas chambers is good but it spares the victims most of the trauma compared to getting raped and/tortured, forced to die a painful death either way. I mean, generally speaking. Some of the Nazis’ victims still died in agony but the victims of those regimes just suffered more, in my opinion. In case you’re curious, I was lowkey talking about the Ustaše, Soviets and Japanese. I witnessed Japanese soldiers raping a Chinese woman in public when I went to China for a few days. It was enough to make even Germans disgusted.

    With that being said, don’t feel too guilty, especially if you were a soldier who wasn’t really involved in the atrocities. What happened to the victims wasn’t your fault at all. This happened because the leaders were really good at brainwashing us. If your past life self was born somewhere in the 1910s or later, then the brainwashing would be more effective because it was part of the education system for me when I was in high school. While I was a teenager, I believed the Nazis naïvely and I needed a denazification just so that I could fit in with the Western Allies after I defected in 1945.

    I’m more angry than I’m guilty over being involved in the atrocities. The Nazi leaders tricked me into doing this when I couldn’t have done them otherwise! Unlike Sophie Scholl, I didn’t see through the propaganda. We were about the same age(well I was 2 years older) but unlike her, I believed in the ideology and found it attractive, mainly because of the anti-communist part. I was a wealthy person and something I learnt from History class is that Hitler used the anti-communist sentiment to rise to power. I was played. The only groups of people the Nazis hated but I didn’t were the Slavs and people of colour but that’s another story for another day.

    Your philosophy professor was right. Just live in the present. Don’t focus too much in the past. For me, I’m focusing on making a YouTube video and I want it to be perfect. Something like that. Just think in present and future, not in past. I mean, you can’t change the past but you can change the present and future. Don’t let your past drag you down and just stay strong.

    Ps. I’m sorry if my reply seems like a rant, that wasn’t my intention.
     
    Dana likes this.
  14. Stewardess Ester Ősz

    Stewardess Ester Ősz Senior Member

    Joined:
    Apr 5, 2019
    Messages:
    58
    Likes Received:
    45
    Location:
    North
    I read through this tread, and since I am a dead German myself (with only little memories, and never done a regression), I must say I am sorry that you feel so much quilt about the war and the stuff you did during the war. I belive I was connected to the war machine myself, probably as a soldier. And I dont think I was against Hitler og something, I probably liked the national socialism. (At least I feel good from looking at old pictures from the NS rallies and listening to Hitlers speaches and so on, so I guess I had an okay relationship to the NS-movement at the time.) But I do not feel any guilt for it today, what so ever. Sometimes when I think back at myself at that time, I "feel" like I was using weapons; pistols and machine guns. But I still dont feel any guilt for it. To be honest, the shooting I did, felt (and still does feel to me) like "doing what must be done"-kind of feeling. I'm sorry if this makes me sound like I'm a very unempathic, cold and sadistic person - but I got to be honest and this is the truth about me and ww2. That doesnt mean I would shoot or hurt somebody now. Not at all, that would never fall me in. I'm totally against both death penalty for criminals, totally against abortion, euthanasia and all kinds of murders on human beings. And I am also very much against all use of violence towards both human and animals.

    I just want to say, dont feel guilt for your german soldier life. Rather think about it as something thats positive to be able to recall. And it was also not only murder and destruction and blood and pain and suffering all of it. I myself had an incredible life then, with incredibly great emotions and experiences. When I look at pictures and films from the front and other places, I always get very nostalgic and I can recall many feelings and atmosfeares of that time. And I think its fantastic to be able to, and very, very positive also.

    Do I feel shame for writing this? Not at all. I was in the middle of Armageddon. It was incredible, and it is incredible to look back.
     
    Dana likes this.

Share This Page