Chart for Stevenson case

Discussion in 'SCIENTIFIC and ANECDOTAL research' started by Deborah, Oct 21, 2006.

  1. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Reincarnation: The Case of Imad Elawar

    In all cases, there was at least one informant for each item and at least one corroborator. In many cases, there were two or more informants and corroborators.

    Evidence from Imad Elawar in advance of Stevenson's visit to Khriby.

    Item Comments
    1. His name was Bouhamzy and he lived in Khriby.
    1. The first name was never used (i.e., Ibrahim).
    2. He had a woman called Jamileh.
    2. Correct: Ibrahim's mistress.
    3. She was beautiful.
    3. CorrectJamileh was famous in Khriby for her beauty.
    4. She wore high heels.
    4. Correct, and very unusual amongst Druse women.
    5. He had a brother 'Amin'.
    5. Amin was a close relative. Close relatives may be
    termed 'brother'.
    6. Amin worked in Tripoli.
    6. Correct.
    7. Amin worked in a courthouse.
    7. CorrectAmin was an official of the Lebanese Government. His
    office was in a courthouse.
    8. There was someone called 'Mehibeh'.
    8. Cousin of Ibrahim Bouhamzy.
    9. He had brothers called Said and Toufic.
    9. correctIbrahim had cousins called Said and Toufic: see point 5.
    10. He had a sister, Huda.
    10. Correct.
    11. A truck ran over a man, broke both his legs, and crushed
    his trunk.
    11. All details correct for Said Bouhamzy (note 9).
    12. He (Ibrahim) was a friend of Mr Kemal Jouhblatt.
    12. Correct -Ibrahim was a friend of this Druse politician and philosopher.
    13. He was very fond of hunting.
    13. Correct - Ibrahim was passionately fond of hunting. Imad frequently asked his father to take him hunting.
    14. He had a double-barrelled shotgun.
    14. Correct.
    15. He also had a rifle.
    15. Correct.
    16. He had hidden his gun.
    16. Correct. Presumably refers to rifle, which is an illegal
    possession in Lebanon.
    17. He had a brown dog and had one beaten another dog.
    17. Ibrahim had a brown dog, which had once fought with
    another dog which Ibrahim had beaten.
    18. His house was in Khriby: there was a slope before it.
    18. Correct.
    19. There were two wells at the house, one full and one
    empty,
    19. Correct. These were not spring wells, but concrete concavities used for storing grape juice. During the rainy season one became filled with water, whilst the shallower one did not, since water evaporated from it. Hence one was full and one empty.
    20. They were building a new garden when he died.
    20. Correct - When Ibrahim died, the garden was being rebuilt.
    21. There were apple and cherry trees in the garden.
    21. Correct.
    22. He had a small yellow car, and a minibus.
    22. Both correct.
    23. He also had a truck.
    23. Correct.
    24. He used the truck for hauling rocks.
    24. Correct.
    25. There were two garages at his house.
    25. Almost correct. Ibrahim kept his vehicles in the open,
    outside two sheds.
    26. The tools for the car were kept in the attic.
    26. Correct.
    27. He had a goat, and sheep.
    27. Correct.
    28. He had five children.
    28. Quite wrong: he had none. Said (note 9) had five
    sons.

    the full article can be read HERE and HERE. In fact their chart is much easier to read. In mine - the first # 1 etc is the child's story the second # 1 etc...... are the facts.
     
  2. tiltjlp

    tiltjlp A Recycled Soul

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    That list really is impressive. What stands out for me are all the small details that few if any people would know, no matter how much digging they did. Two good examples would be that the tools for the car were kept in the attic and that Ibrahim had a brown dog, which had once fought with another dog which Ibrahim had beaten.

    John
     
  3. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Hi John,

    When I read through cases such as the one above, I keep thinking of the scientists POV represented on TV reincarnation specials; especially when they say - they just do not see any proof.

    There is one heck of a lot of evidence - that's for sure. ;)
     
  4. John

    John New Member

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    Critique by Dr Leonard Angel

    Deborah and John,

    From what I read on the www, the reality is that the Imad Elewar study has been hotly contested.

    A 1994 critique by philosopher, Dr Leonard Angel, is referenced here...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twenty_Cases_Suggestive_of_Reincarnation

    A detailed reply to Angel was written by Dr Stevenson, but only part of this was published...

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m2843/is_n3_v19/ai_16836673

    Personally I think it would be a very good thing if Dr Stevenson's full reply could be located and included in this forum.

    -- john

     
  5. hedpe9999

    hedpe9999 New Member

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    Here is an objective critique of both Angel's and Stevenson's reponses:

    http://www.criticandokardec.com.br/imad_elawar_revisited.html

    Also, Tucker implies that the Elawar case has problems:

    "JT: By all appearances, the children report memories from the vantage point of only one deceased individual. One possible exception is Stevenson’s case in Twenty Cases Suggestive of Reincarnation of Imad Elawar, who vividly described a fatal accident in which the uncle of the man eventually identified as the previous personality died, but that is a very complex case. Otherwise, the details given by the children match the life of the identified previous personalities and not their relatives. The parents sometimes try to fit the various statements of the children into a meaningful pattern (as in the case of Imad Elawar when the parents were judged to have inferred details about the previous life that were not accurate), but when the previous personality is identified, the statements that are correct are correct for that one individual. Some statements are incorrect, of course, just as some of our memories of our own childhoods are incorrect."
     

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