Jewish girl forced into Catholic convent

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by Looking Backwards, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. Looking Backwards

    Looking Backwards Senior Registered

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    So I was meditating earlier and had two strange visions. Unfortunately I forget the precise details as I did not have a chance to write down everything, so I apologize in advance for some things not being clear.

    The first was of a girl in a bed, tossing and turning. She has dark hair and pale skin, and is crying. I think she has just given birth, and she knew the birth would kill her but was forced to anyway.

    The second was a young girl in a convent, being whipped by a someone I assumed is a Nun. She is singing about God and forgiveness, and I'm not sure if she means it or knows she has to.

    The scene goes to a woman who is very distraught. I can't see her, but I feel I might be her - I certainly empathize with her. I realize the girl was Jewish and being forced into the Catholic faith - and was later forced to have a baby which resulted in her dying.

    Right before these visions, I had started singing without any plan to do so. Unfortunately I do not remember the words, just that they were strange.

    When I "woke up" I was confused and tried to piece together what I'd imagined. I was very angry to think that a Jewish girl would be forced into a convent (and indeed, it's a sad thought). I tried to think more, and a few random words came to mind:

    - Jiavo (he-ya-vo or "jiavo" with very little enunciation in the J)

    - Rudya

    - Masala

    Questions:

    - Does anyone know what any of those words mean?

    - Was it ever the case that Jewish children, in any country, were forced into the Catholic faith?

    One tidbit that might tie in with this vision: Before I started doing research on Catholicism, I'd always assumed that it was the strictest of the Christian denominations. I now know this is not the case, but it was certainly my earlier consensus. Yet I can't think of anyone who might have made me think that. We were never strict protestants so there was no bias there, and I don't think any of my friends ever said such a thing - some of them were Catholics themselves.

    And because I know someone is going to ask, no, I've never really felt any ties with the Jewish faith. I'm not even sure I was that girl so much as a witness to her struggle, or, if I was that anguished woman, perhaps even a participant. Although I have taken to saying "oy vey" a lot, but I think that's mostly due to having had a number of Jewish friends at one point.

    ETA: I also got the name "Ahura Mazda" in my head, but I've had it before. Apparently it's a Persian Deity, but I'm not sure if that's related or not... I'm not sure if the words I heard were even all related to those visions.
     
  2. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    Hi Looking Backwards,

    I’m not sure that “forced” is the right word in this instance, but I do know that Polish social worker Irena Sendler helped children escape from the Warsaw ghetto during WWII - and some of the children were placed in Catholic institutions to keep them safe.


    The children were placed with Polish families, the Warsaw orphanage of the Sisters of the Family of Mary, or Roman Catholic convents such as the Little Sister Servants of the Blessed Virgin Mary Conceived Immaculate at Turkowice and Chotomów. Irena took down the names of all of the children and kept them in a jar, vowing to reunite them with their families and/or relatives after the war. She tried - but unfortunately most of the children's families were killed at Treblinka, or had gone missing. The children had nowhere to go, so I believe they generally remained with their foster families or in the Catholic institutions until they were old enough to be on their own.


    Aili
     
  3. Nightrain

    Nightrain Senior Registered

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    From what I've understood, there was a period in which all schools of the Irish Republic were Parochial.?
     
  4. Blueheart

    Blueheart Senior Member

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    Two points:


    1 - Throughout history, females of all ages were forced into convents. This decision was largely made by the males in their families (father, son, husband who wanted to get rid of his wife, etc.)


    2 - During the Spanish Inquisition, Jewish people were forced to either convert or leave the country.
     
  5. Looking Backwards

    Looking Backwards Senior Registered

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    Huh. Incidentally, I have always felt tied to Spain. But it's not making any inner alarm bells go off.

    I read somewhere else that sometimes those children were converted by well-meaning Nuns too, which would fit with the woman in my vision who seemed to feel that she only did what she believed she had to do, but was still extremely anguished by the girl/younger woman's death.


    I haven't been able to remember or even feel anything else since then. I wonder if where I went itself was a trigger? It was an empty Church.
     
  6. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Fascinating memories. Thank you for posting! Any updates?
     
  7. RemainingSpirit

    RemainingSpirit Remaining Spirit

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    It wasn't just in Spain that Jews were forced into being practicing Christians. Most of Europe followed that practice. You couldn't live safely in England up through Stuart times, without proclaiming Christian faith.
     
  8. hydrolad

    hydrolad Senior Moderator Super Moderator

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    Staying within the theme of this thread and of the Forum, I might add this about religious intolerance in modern times.


    I had (and still have) a good friend who is Jewish and he is not afraid to admit it, which in the past has lead to snide remarks and comments in the Department.


    Now, under the harassment regs, this behavior is no longer tolerated, but even though I didn't always agree with him, I always treated his religion with respect and he became (and still is) a good friend of mine.


    I could never understand why people couldn't accept other peoples differences and just get along with each other, perhaps in a Past Life (PL) I was a victim of intolerance and ridicule, whatever it was, it taught me to be more tolerant and understanding of diverse groups of other humans.


    And with the recent events in the headlines, we could sure use a good "dose" of this medicine called "tolerance" before any more people die!
     
  9. Truthseeker

    Truthseeker Former Moderator

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    Anti-semitism is not something that started in the 20th century. It has a long history in Europe as well as the Catholic Church having a long history of forced conversions.
     

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