Pre Life Plans

Discussion in 'Reincarnation Questions' started by Ceridwen, Apr 2, 2014.

  1. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    Out of interest, I wondered if anyone has any knowledge/memories of their own Pre Life Plans?

    As in, I guess most of us on this Forum believe that we ourselves planned at least the basic gist of our current life before we were born (ie what sex to be born, when, who to, what country, the basic theme/s to be covered in the forthcoming life).

    I would be interested in knowing if there is any way I can access what I personally arranged for the rest of my life. I've often wondered what, if anything, else of note there might be to come in the rest of this life. Must admit that, right now, it would cheer me up quite noticeably if I knew there were only a few years left (all else being equal), rather than the distinctly depressing thought that there could be another 30 years or so to go yet before I can "get off that wheel" iyswim.cover face
     
  2. argonne1918

    argonne1918 Senior Registered

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    If you think about how your life has unfolded thus far, you can sort of figure out a lot of it.
     
  3. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    I understand the way you feel, Ceridwen, although I don't want to know what's ahead. I would be very happy with peace and security, but knowing myself, I've probably planned the "Tower of Terror" (Disneyland ride!) If anything good is going to happen to us, we will have to be proactive, and make it so. Some years ago, I had a Samhain party. Part of the entertainment was telling "fortunes". All of the guests were "mature". I had trouble thinking of good fortunes to give them. It seemed that everything good had already happened to us, if it was going to. We weren't going to fall in love if we hadn't already, achieve stellar business success, win a Nascar race - or even go on "Dancing With the Stars". :laugh: I think that as we age, our definition of "good" has to change. It's a good day for me when nothing hurts, I enjoy a hearty laugh, and I have a bit of chocolate after dinner. If we are happily engaged in life, maybe when it ends won't matter? We will think about living, not escaping the "wheel". Like you, I have times when I think, "Why am I still here? It would be easier to be on the other side." I must have already made the choice about when this incarnation will end. I think I will have to incarnate again, and that is a scary thought. I hope it helps to realize you are not alone in your thoughts. Being "old" is as confusing as being a teenager! :cool
     
  4. usetawuz

    usetawuz Senior Registered

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    I don't believe that we intended to know what we face during this lifetime. I have been told repeatedly by guidance that for me to know in advance what I would encounter would "take the fun out of it, and obviate the reason for living my life". I do believe, like Argonne mentioned, that you can look at what got you to where you are and obtain some kind of impression of where you are going, though that is certainly a subject for hugely varying interpretation...and while I can see how I got to where I am now, it didn't progress in any sort of clearly visible, understandable steps which would provide real guidance, much less give me indications of the events in which I planned to participate.


    I have seen what I was led to believe was the blueprint of my lifetime...it was a three-dimensional, enormously complex map of interactions, events and decisions. I knew what it was, though I could not understand what I was looking at without being told (I was shown a previous event in my past and the numerous alternatives which were available dependent on what I chose at the time...interesting that only one or two of the choices did not come back onto my current path). If you have seen "Adjustment Bureau", remember the books illustrating the courses the human's lives followed over the mass of variables available, just enlarge that, make it 3-d and add color with views (like movies) for each of the intersection points. To me, the plans that are our lives are incomprehensibly complex to a human mind. We will see it all, if we want to, on the other side, but for now it is my impression we are to play our role as it comes.
     
  5. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    I can see that I have made one or two noticeable contributions to Society earlier on in my life. One thing that is still going on is quite definitely my idea. The other one (which you might even have heard of) is possibly my idea.


    So, I've not been a total wastrel of my years to date you could sayLOL. There are those things that I can think "Mine and I'm proud of...".


    I don't count myself as "old" yet. More late middle-agedLOL. I'm near enough to old age to understand what the phrase "Old age isn't for cissies" is about, as I've watched some old people and how life is for them and been quite horrified at the amount of illness/life restriction/etc they are coping with. I have the get-out clause personally that "If things become too bad in that respect...then I'm outa here...", as I simply wouldn't put up with a life as bad as that I see some old people having. At least the majority of the time I can count blessings that I'm not in pain or discomfort and, with my take on life that I wouldn't put up with that for long, I never will be for long.


    But I do get the point you make of "If you haven't done it by now then maybe you never will...". I know its "Never say never" because there are people who fall in love/get a good career going/etc quite late on in life...so you never know. But I guess people like that are in the minority and the rest "have a laugh" and "eat chocolate" and make the best of what there is.


    I'm still struggling with early days of retirement personally and wondering where to get achievements/sense of purpose from now that I'm no longer my younger self out to achieve a Better World for Society and with those personal hopes that I might yet meet Mr Right/get paid to do a job I would choose anyway etc.


    As you know, I don't personally agree people have to come back to Earth again, whether they want to or not. I do believe we have freewill on that point. I'd be terrified of the thought of "Earth again" whether I liked it or no and its a consolation to think "That will be that ...and never again" once I shuffle off this mortal coil. Sometimes that's the one positive thought I can come up with in my lower moments "Oh well...at least I get to choose whether to come back again and I've chosen not to. So, at least I'm not in for another stint:D".


    The one advantage teenagers have over us is hope (ie that things will be better). Well...I know that we did as teenagers....as, at that moment in history, things were getting better as far as we knew. I'm not so sure that's true for teenagers these days (wondering how to get a job/career, whether they will ever be able to buy their own home and so on).


    I tend to think that some people actually enjoy a bit of a challenge and regard hardship of one description or another as "Challenge"/"Adventure" or the like and I guess they are the ones most likely to choose to come back here again. I tend to regard it as akin to "Well I had to live in grotty bedsits when young - but I'd rather have had my own house right from the start" and "Some people like camping - each to their own...they can go off and do it...but I'm not going with them. Roughing it isn't my thing".
     
  6. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    Certainly an interesting thought to think on usetawuz of most of the alternative choices you could have made leading back to the same basic path.


    Hmm...as my basic choices where I could have made a very different decision seem to revolve around living somewhere different. I could have lived in a different English city, I could have lived in a Scandinavian country, I could have lived in an Arabic country. Right at this moment, I am struggling with the fact that I chose to move from England to Wales (which, as a home-owner, rather than renter, means some irrevocable choices were made). I still see that I had no option but to sell my last house and that then led on to the decision to move to Wales.


    As a child, I was an Armed Forces child and therefore moved around the world by my fathers job against my will. I managed to play my little part in getting my father to leave the armed forces after a while and had some stability at last and could reckon on staying put at last. Then came later adulthood and the need (long story....) to sell my last house and it just wasn't possible to stay put in my area because it wasn't possible for me to buy my next house in my area and hence the basic reason for another enforced move (this time one that has been down to my own life, rather than someone else's life iyswim).


    I struggled as a child with the enforced moves because of my fathers' life. I'm struggling now with a move that wasn't totally of my choice and is because of my own life. I never have liked decisions being made for me and am guessing that maybe this decision was really made by me (but as one of my Pre Life Decisions and presumably I had my reasons).


    Some fellow movers here said to me that they moved to here partly to "get themselves out of their Comfort Zone". I'm certainly understanding that. Until I moved, I hadn't realised how much I am a typical product of an English middle-class academic little city....here I don't have any of that (it aint English, it aint middle-class, it aint academic and it aint a city). I'm not used to dogs being allowed to bark outside and there is a fair bit of that here...darn it. I am used to lots of choice and having pretty nearly every facility I could require nearby. It's been a surprise to me to witness the number of occasions where someone else seems to be trying to make my choice for me about something here. Before moving here, I took it totally for granted that of course I am the one making my choices in every respect. It's proving "interesting" to get some other people to accept that I will continue to be the one making all my own choices......
     
  7. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    I probably misunderstood your life, Ceridwen. I was speaking from my perspective of being "shell-shocked" by my own, although by many measurements it isn't that bad. I am not that old, just rather hopeless. I think you "nailed" one thing - the difference between youth and age is often hope. At least, the young should be hopeful. When I gave my party, the guests were mostly in their 50's, and not retired yet. Ten years later, only "bad" things have happened to them - mostly serious illness, and financial problems. Why can't we at least "chart" happy endings? I would like to see a few happy endings. I realize our early lives need challenges. I hope retirement will be different for you, and maybe I am just surrounded by unfortunate people. But, they were good people, every one. I wonder why some of them cling to life, because I probably wouldn't. I didn't ask about your move, because from the tone of your post, I thought perhaps it was disappointing. There must be things you need to learn, and do, and be, in your new location. It was something you charted - or as Usetawuz said, one of your "option lines". You did choose it - perhaps your soul knows better what you need than does your conscious mind? I am just a "buzz kill" today. Sorry! Nothing hurts, and I will eat a bit of chocolate! :laugh:
     
  8. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    No need for being at all apologetic Briar Rose.


    I think a lot of people end up feeling a bit (or a lot) shell-shocked by life. As you say, it would be nice to see some happy endings wouldn't it?


    Hence, I guess, one of the reasons why most people go "Aw!" and get a smile on their face if, for instance, two old people meet up in later life and get married and are obviously happy with each other. I certainly go "Aw and good for them" when I spot anything like that. I think it's down to "Well, someone has had that Happy Ending then":D and we smile thinking "There's hope yet...." (not specifically in that context, but in any other one as well). It's also nice to see an older person there, certificate in hand, having obtained a degree they studied for later in life and its the same reaction of "Good for them".


    Later life can be a bummer too. Looking round and I can see one good friend whose health is steadily going downhill and her husband is also having health problems. Another friend has a daughter (complete with young kids) who seems intent on making a mess of her life and is using up my friends' money right, left and centre (ie as she keeps subsidising this daughter) and so the Tragedy Rollcall goes on.


    Hence the pleasure at seeing something nice happening to an older person that they hadn't necessarily expected.


    Re my move, I didn't expect to be settled "overnight". I was/am giving myself time. Let's hope it doesn't take as long as a cheery little Welsh woman said the other day of "It will take you 3-4 years to feel at home here". She was trying to be friendly and helpful and I appreciated that thought, but 3-4 yearsOMG. There have been unexpected downside things and I am struggling with those. Fortunately, I've met a group of people in same boat (ie English people/similar age/all recently moved to the area/all trying to renovate the houses they bought) and that is a blessing for all of us that we have each other to share notes and social outings with.
     
  9. Mere Dreamer

    Mere Dreamer Senior Registered

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    Hmm ... rather than knowing, I get a ping-back on the right ideas.


    I often consider it similar to looking out over a fog covered valley from some point (perhaps a tree) and seeing a glowing light in the distance. As long as I can see the light in the general direction I'm heading, I know I'm on track.


    I might have to go around swampy areas, trek over rugged terrain, climb up side-valleys that don't quite head in my direction ... but there's always a sense of "this way is closer than that one" ... and if there isn't, it usually doesn't matter much because either one will move me to a point where I'll be able to see more clearly.


    I do have some repeat calls on my life that keep reoccurring in one form or other in my journals. The plans themselves are never the same, but the core of them ... the thing that drives them ... is always the same. My life can actually leave healing to the people who live after me.


    At one point I thought I was pointlessly fantasizing, but I'm actually seeing clear progress in that direction now (even if I am only on the first slope of a mountain) and it makes me feel awed and privileged to be part of it, because if I could do anything, that particular application of my life makes me shiver with joy and a sense of "if only I could always do this, then my life would have so much meaning!"


    *shrug*
     
  10. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    It's harder to move from the city to the country, than the country to the city. The first move I made from California to a small town in Florida was really difficult. I missed Disneyland, the L.A. County Fair, concerts, museums, sporting events, etc. In my life time, California has been a bit like ancient Rome - no one wanted Caesar to exile them to the provinces! The only explanation I have for this is that city people expect to be entertained, while country people expect to entertain themselves. I suspect that in many ways, the "country" way may be healthier, but the adjustment can be huge. Eventually, I made the adjustment, and it would have been easier with the internet. I'm glad that you have other English people to ease the transition. I wonder if you were all Welsh in another life?
     
  11. Cryscat

    Cryscat Senior Member

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    3 - 4 years to get used to a new area is actually about right. It can take a bit longer sometimes. 4 years ago, hubby and I bought a house about 20 mile away from our old apt. Its taken me those 4 years to finally feel "at home" in this area though I still have some more connecting to do.


    It goes by pretty fast though. Makes my wonder why time flies by so fast now and when I was a kid, time crawled by.
     
  12. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    Some very constructive thoughts there folks.


    The "light in distance" thing is a very useful guideline thought. This is the thing I guess...ie as long as we are heading in the general direction of "where we are going". There are twists and turns in the road and sometimes we veer off piste, but keeping that destination in mind in the distance is a useful thought.


    I can certainly see the point of city people expecting to be entertained, whereas country people have to make their own entertainment. In my last city there was certainly plenty going on and it was possible to be out every night of the week at meetings/meals out/specific social events/take your pick. It was more easily possible to think "Next please" about anything and, indeed, anyone. When I was younger, I certainly had my share of boyfriends and the fact that it was a fair-size urban area meant there was always someone else. I certainly never stayed with a boyfriend any longer than I really wanted to, because there really was "plenty more fish in the sea" and, in my younger days, I could feel confident of someone else I liked the look of coming along soon enoughLOL. Same with social things - if you don't like a restaurant, walk straight out and choose from loads of others.


    Choice of anything is much more restricted here and I certainly notice that most people have turned up quite well in time for anything social here (rather than casually wandering in on time or later, as happened in my last area). I'm having to learn to be punctual again and, in fact, turn up a bit early for the "advance social chatting". You have to make more effort to get on with people here, precisely because its a smaller place. I wouldn't necessarily choose to be social with the next door neighbour elsewhere, but here she was soon informing me that people "look out for each other" here and she has my key in case and she has my phone number in case and I know who keeps her key etc.


    Country people expecting to entertain themselves is a thought that has occurred to me. In this area, any English people I talk to are getting on with the gardening for instance and people back in home area rarely mentioned it. There were people doing "creative" type hobbies back in my home area, but I notice a heck of a lot more of "home made craft-y" type items for sale here in this much smaller community than I ever did back home. You can tell it's pretty rural Wales if there is a lot of upcycled clothing available for sale in shopsLOL, whereas I never saw any at all back home. Guess that is partly people entertaining themselves and partly less access to shops to buy clothing in the first place. I certainly miss Marks & Spencers here (ie major British clothes chain store). In home area, I would automatically walk in there first when looking for clothing. Here in my little town, there isn't one. I have to go to nearby larger towns to find one and then its MUCH smaller than I am used to.


    It's a thought that hadn't occurred to me...but it could be the case that this group of people (ie fellow attendees at a Welsh class) were Welsh before. The first one to approach me chatting about us going out socially does have a rather "Welsh" approach to just starting chatting to anyone going. Us English are normally much more reserved (those from Southern England like me anyway). I had a little episode the other day of visiting a part of Wales that is described as "little England beyond Wales" and where there is/has been for some time a high proportion of English people. The English people in a room I was in didn't so much as look at me acknowledging another person was there as they came in:confused:, but, as soon as a Welsh person walked in, she was instantly smiling and making general comments to all (and I was the only one there that got into conversation with her...and the other English people still sat there pretending no-one else was in the room).


    I guess getting settled in an area is partly a case of getting your bearings as to knowing where everything is. So, I'm making sure I know where everything I require is (assuming its here:rolleyes:) and what the surrounding places are like.
     
  13. argonne1918

    argonne1918 Senior Registered

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    Sounds like you were probably Welsh in a past life.
     
  14. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    The situation you describe is like the U.S., Ceridwen. We are so large, that it can be like going to another country when you travel. Californians aren't "chatty". We have to allow too many strangers into our personal space everyday. The first time I lived in Texas, I was astonished when people talked to me in shopping malls, and asked me to come to church. It was nice, though! People move around more now, so some of the regional differences and accents are fading a bit. I think the posters were right who said that it might take five years before you really feel "at home". When I buy a house, it takes five years before the house is "mine". Did you do a "space clearing" when you moved in? I know you are doing a lot of renovation, but a "space clearing" is different. Even if it takes five years to feel "at home", you are "stretching" as a person, and learning new ways. This is good, and I think this is a path you "charted" to follow. Have you felt any PL connection with your new acquaintances?
     
  15. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    Hi Briar Rose


    Yes...I remember your comments re spaceclearing and having a new broom etc.


    I'm rather working on the basis that spaceclearing comes at two levels, ie the physical level of making the house look like mine (my décor/my carpets/etc/etc) and its about halfway there at the moment. I think the inside of the house should be pretty much together in a couple of months from now and will have changed from what I call Old Woman Style and looking and feeling distinctly dirty and not even functioning very well at a physical level to being pretty usable/clean/my style.


    That is one part of it.


    The other part is space clearing so to say.


    I am rather thinking that I should get the physical space sorted out to be more functional/clean/like Me first and then I can do the more "space clearing" type part iyswim.


    Doesn't feel quite the right stage to me to try that whilst the house is still in chaos and rather dirty etc etc.


    I am planning too though.


    Five years sounds a long time to wait before expecting to "feel at home"OMG.


    Today saw me bursting into tears in front of my Main Workman and him busy telling me how much more at home I would feel when the house and garden are together and that I should go back for a visit in a couple of years and would then beat a hasty retreat back here and feel I had done the right thing to move here. Bet he didn't think counselling was part of his job descriptioncover faceLOL.


    Right now...for two pins and a Premium Bonds or Lottery win I'd buy a house back there. But I remind myself that, logically, there is no way I could or can afford the extra £100,000 or so that buying the level of house that was LONG overdue for me back there.


    If the Universe means me to go back there, then I guess the Universe will 'think' "Okay...then...I'll give her the financial wherewithal to buy that type of house back there". If it doesn't do that, then I guess I'm supposed to be in a rather different environment and things WILL work out for me...


    Think positive I am telling myself.


    Re PL connections with my new acquaintances/friends. Early days....the one who has been initiating social activities with me to date is "same boat as me" in some respects in our situations at present and I can sympathise with a personal problem situation (not of her making) that she has on her plate apart from all this. I haven't been in that set-up of the personal problem situation she is in, but a good friend has had a similar one, so I have some idea how she is feeling about this. Early days....
     
  16. starrynight

    starrynight Senior Registered

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    :DOh Ceridwen, it is a hard one moving around the country.


    Once I moved to my nearest town & never felt at home there, other times I could be somewhere such a short time and want to stay forever.


    I have to agree with the concensus though in that on average it takes me about 3 or 4 years to feel really at home. On top of that on average we move about every 4/5 years.


    Just a few points I thought worth adding:


    1. I don't class anything as a wrong. I certainly think I wish I had/hadn't done that sometimes but take it as a learning curve rather than beating myself up.


    2. Sometimes the hardest start has the best end.


    3. Not having the money to do as you wish can be a good thing. The universe knows the long term plan for us-we just don't see it.


    Lastly, on a personal note, I'd love to know which bit of Wales you've moved to:D


    Also being from another area of the country many people flock to I can add from friends how it sometimes took them a while to feel accepted and not an outsider in a rural area but I don't think they would move away now.


    I find people who follow their hearts and move around to where they would like to be much more interesting than those who woould like to but never have the nerve
     
  17. BriarRose

    BriarRose Senior Registered

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    Have a drink, and a cry, Ceridwen. I had a meltdown when I was trying to fix this house in front of a group of workmen. I found out that the house had termites and a completely broken fireplace on the same day. The house was full of chimney sweeps, electricians, etc., while I confronted the realtor on the phone. She and the sellers knew about the problems, and deliberately concealed them. It's nine years later, and I found a way around the fireplace, and killed the termites. (Not the realtor. Karma will get her!) :laugh: My house has flaws, but so do I. I have had to learn to live with imperfection. (My lesson - not yours) It will all "come right". Maybe there is no avenue of escape to whence you came for a reason. Is there anything you are learning from this? I know - you don't want to "learn". Neither do I! Sometimes, I look up at Heaven, and say, "Enough, already!"
     
  18. starrynight

    starrynight Senior Registered

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    I think you are being "realistically" positive;)
     
  19. starrynight

    starrynight Senior Registered

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    Yes our house is a never ending list of need to do's.


    My friends think we are mad to have taken on such a project when we could have spent the money going out & having loads of holidays. What fun would that have been???:laugh::rolleyes:
     
  20. Ceridwen

    Ceridwen Senior Registered

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    I'm in West Wales..about as far over as you could go without falling into the ocean.


    My friends don't describe me as mad. They describe me as brave. Well...coming here on my own is, I think, the hardest bit of it. The other people I know seem to have come as couples. Though, of course, I'm not at risk of what happened to two couples living nearby I can think of - one had her husband die within the year and the other one looks likely to have the same. At least I bargained on coming here on my own I guess..


    I will (firm resolve time here) have got the inside of the house finished by about two months time. Apart, that is, from the new kitchen I cant afford for the foreseeable future. I have "revamped" the existing kitchen to make it do for however-long-it-has-to.


    I couldn't face having much longer of stuff being undone around me - even if I hadn't come to an area where anything done by workmen takes 2-3 times longer than it should do. As one person put it "They take the 'manana' attitude round here".


    Yep...the "feeling accepted" bit is something too isn't it? I have a "power in the community" type elderly neighbour and she does seem to feel quite free to tell me what she doesn't approve of with what I've donelocked1 (as in biting my tongue hard, as I wouldn't try and tell her what to do...:cool). But I work on it being a mutual "doing favours for each other" type relationship and then bite my tongue some more:cool


    Just to thank everyone for your input..it helps to know people are trying to think up positive comments and suggestions for me:)
     

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