Profound moments

Discussion in 'Reincarnation Questions' started by Tinkerman, May 13, 2005.

  1. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I've been carrying this around for two days and knew I needed to post it here. Have you ever had one of those infinite moments that transcends the here-and-now? That places you in this great creation with a momentary feeling of understanding and awe?

    Two nights ago it was my elderly fathers birthday. He and my invalid mom live in a nearby town. We were sitting on the porch after a blistering day of heat. The air was cool and remarkably clear....a very beautiful night. As my mom and I looked at the stars through binoculars my dad recived a call from one of his even older brothers (they say they are as old as dirt). They talked for a long time, like kids. Joking of old people long ago dead, of old times. It was so nice to hear of those days as if they were just yesterday.

    They then talked of a dear close brother who will die any day. Their conversation resolved in the loss. I said good night and made the long drive home. I drove slowly as if I didn't really wanna go any where. I thought of my dad and his siblings, I had a vision of their youth, of their closeness and now as they are all on the crossroads of this life, passing on, a sense of the cycle hit me. Strangely enough I was on the long dirt road that takes me to the ranch I live. There is one long sweeping hill that approaches my place...as I drove up it my headlights cut out. They just shut off for a few seconds and came back on.

    I had not done anything to cause this and I was a little taken back. But at the same time I have come to accept "signs" like this...especially in moments of deep sirituality, which is what I was feeling. I knew it was some kind of sign. So I stopped. I stopped right on top of the hill. It's very remote there, my ranch and one other are the only ones on it. I shut everthing off and climbed out. AWE. Awe is what I felt as the deep, clear sky enveloped me. The milky way was like a cloud. A hair like crescent moon far on the horizon smiled. Goose bumps were all up and down my body. The only thing I could do was give thanks for such an awesome moment.

    I could see the lights from town in the distance and offered a prayer of wellbeing for my parents. And then I turned to the direction my love, my souls other half, lives in the world and felt an even deeper connection to everything. It was as if the breeze that was blowing was carrying her breath to me...I inhaled it deeply. I looked below at the ranch and the blessings of this life...I could do no more than say thanks. After some time lost in thought I slowly meandered down the lane. I could not speak to any one...conversation would have been so petty. Instead I went to bed and fell deeply into another time.

    Tinkerman
     
  2. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    Tinkerman,

    That was absolutely beautiful, the way you described your profound moment. You brought tears to my eyes! I have had similar moments, but mine usually occur near water for some reason. Oceans, lakes, rivers, streams, it doesn't matter. Thank you for sharing with us!

    Ailish
     
  3. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi Ailish,

    Thanks! I too have had some inspiring times around water. Probably the best was several years ago while camping in Canada. I got up early before anyone else, went up to a cliff overlooking this large lake. The weather was real heavy...large, misty, foggy clouds skooting across the water. Everything was extremely gray. I had my headphones and was playing John Michael Talbots "The Quiet" album. Wow!!! I get goose bumps remembering. The neat thing was I had my video camera down at camp...so I ran down got it and recorded it all with the music. It was rough but I was able to bring a little piece home with me. It was definitely one of those profound moments.

    We don't have much water in these neck of the woods. But a cool thing for me to think about is that where my ranch is was once apart of a huge inland sea. Yep...I live on the bottom of an ocean, well it once was anyway. I assisted a paleontologist from KU explore the hills last summer. It was incredible. Really puts time, as we interpret it, into perspective. Sometimes out in the remote pastures I can feel the ancient spirits...I feel apart of them somehow.

    Peace, Tinkerman
     
  4. Hammy

    Hammy Senior Registered

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    T'man said,
    "Have you ever had one of those infinite moments that transcends the here-and-now? That places you in this great creation with a momentary feeling of understanding and awe?"

    My answer; Yes.
    I've had those moments a lot, not recently, but in the past. I've had what seemed like glimpses of why everything is the way it is, how it started and what it is leading to. Awe is one way of putting it for I can't think of a better word although one would be useful. I've had these glimpses while laying awake and thinking, while standing and doing what you've done, stareing at the stars or while just getting on with life. These moments have always come to me unprompted and always leave me with a feeling of complete happiness or indeed of love.
    I enjoyed your post a lot you created pictures in my mind and I can almost feel the peace and joy of what you've described.
    Thank you very much for sharing.
    Hammy.
     
  5. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

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    These are mystical experiences.

    These experiences are direct experience of God and oneness with the universe. They are (usually) rare, and they are precious.

    The summer I was 17, I worked at Crater Lake, a beautiful national park in southern Oregon. We employees lived in the lodge which is at 7200 ft.

    One day, I had a day off and nobody to do anything with; all of my friends had to work. So I decided to go hiking alone. I took off down a trail into Annie Creek Canyon, and at some point, illusion fell away. I knew, absolutely, that everything was one: "Everything is everything," was the only way I could put it. I was light and bouyant and peaceful as I had never been before -- or since. I reveled in the clear stream, animals, breeze, grass, trees....Every molecule of my being was blessed, and I knew no fear of any kind. On the way back to the lodge, I accepted a ride from some drunk young men from Texas. I felt no fear of them, and they were kind to me and took me where I needed to go. Back at the lodge, my boyfriend told me he'd just gotten fired. I was in such total peace that all I could do was smile and love him and not care.

    The feeling wore off. The next day I was back to being the regular me, but it remains one of my most treasured memories, and I will never forget what I learned that day --because it was the most real experience I've ever had.
     
  6. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

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    Peter Gabriel song

    This song by Peter Gabriel is about a mystical experience:

    Salisbury Hill

    Climbing up on Salisbury Hill
    I could see the city light
    Wind was blowing, time stood still
    Eagle flew out of the night
    He was something to observe
    Came in close, I heard a voice
    Standing, stretching every nerve
    Had to listen, had no choice
    I did not believe the information
    just had to trust imagination
    My heart going boom, boom, boom
    "Son," He said. "Grab your things,
    I've come to take you home."

    To keep in silence I resigned
    My friends would think I was a nut
    Turning water into wine
    Open doors would soon be shut
    So I went from day to day
    Tho' my life was in a rut
    Till I thought of what I'd say
    Which connection I should cut
    I was feeling part of the scenery
    I walked right out of the machinery
    My heart going boom, boom, boom
    "Hey," He said. "Grab your things
    I've come to take you home."

    When illusion spins her net
    I'm never where I want to be
    And liberty she pirouette
    When I think that I am free
    Watched by empty silhouettes
    Who close their eyes but still can see
    No one taught them etiquette
    I will show another me
    Today I don't need a replacement
    I'll tell them what the smile on my face meant
    My heart going boom, boom, boom
    "Hey," I said. "You can keep my things,
    they've come to take me home."
     
  7. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Hi Hammie, Hi Mertzie

    Moments like these, to me, are infrequent. But strangely I feel I have the ability to go to these places and almost create them...if I choose. But I almost see them as sacred and not to be toyed with like a child's game. Somewhere in my past incarnations I know I've been a holyman several times. One that I feel frequently involves a man that is/was indigenous to this area, the high plains. When I go to some of the ancient settlements that are unearthed occasionally my spirit surges with a kind of belonging. I can say with a certainty that life here prior to the 1800's was a beautiful existence. Somehow I can see that when I'm up on the hills. Heck, fixing fence is a chore to some but to me its an opportunity to go to those remote areas where few people have never set foot. Kindred spirits are there.

    It seems these profound moments, to all of us, occur in solitude and in the beauty of creation in its most natural settings. Is it the senses feasting on beauty? Is it our spirit feasting on an inkling of understanding? The only thing to me that will ever complete these moments is when some day or some future life I can once again stand in them with my love in one arm and the other grasping upwards in thanksgiving at creation and Him.

    Thanks for the beautiful lyrics Mertzie...I can't wait to hear him sing it.

    Blessed be! Tinkerman
     
  8. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    Hey Tinkerman,

    It sound like you live in a very beautiful place! It must be interesting, knowing that your land used to be at the bottom of the sea! What a neat experience, exploring with a paleontologist! I'd love to do that! And I agree that fixing fences wouldn't exactly be a chore, but more of a gift of quiet reflection.
    I think that too many people these days are caught up in being materialistic and driven to succeed, and I believe this comes with a price. There are so very many unhappy people walking around, lost and angry all the time because of what they don't have. They never think about what they do have. What a perfect gift each day is. Success to me is something entirely different from mainstream society's ideals.
    Ambition is a wonderful thing, but not at the expense of forgetting where you came from, and what is truly important in life. I think that's why so many profound moments occur in nature. It's our past reaching out to us, enticing us to remember the simpler times, the good life. I know I long for the simpler times of my past lives. Although I am a city girl now, I always make time to visit with nature, reflect in her beauty and be very thankful for the things I have. Nature shows us the beauty of just ~being~

    Hugs to all,

    Ailish
     
  9. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

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    Dear Tink - Peter Gabriel's song has always given me the willies (in a good way). It's beautiful. I hope you enjoy it. It's actually a very exciting song.

    No, I don't think we can create these experiences. I think they are divine grace - moments that are gifts and messages from the divine. We are not the originators of them, and they are sacred.

    Yes, it seems they do occur in solitude.

    Mystical experiences happen in a variety of ways, though, and there is a great variety in mystical experiences themselves. For instance, the German writer and mystic, Jacob Boehme, was looking at a bowl of fruit one day and suddenly comprehended the oneness of all things. When that door opens, and what happens, is different for everyone, but it is spontaneous and not consciously designed by the fortunate experiencer.
     
  10. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I agree completely. I should not have said we can create them. What I meant is we can search for them. I have almost made it my lifes quest to find them. The one the night of my fathers birthday just happened. The amazing thing was the headlights going out!

    There are two books I would recommend to you two. Both are written by Roger Housden one of my favorite writers. They are "In Search of Rumi" and "Sacred Journeys in a Modern World". Both speak to the idea of "Profound Moments".

    Mertzie I think, you being an english teacher, might enjoy his poetry interpretation books. Two of my most favorite poems are reviewed in his books: The Layers by Stanley Kunitz and The Last Gods by Galaway Kinnel. They deal with these rare moments.

    Ahhh the wonder of it all.... Tman
     
  11. mertzie

    mertzie Senior Registered

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  12. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Thank You for sharing your profound moments. I have found that it is difficult to convey the experience - via the written word. It just isn't the same. The inner awareness and vibration - and awe that I have experienced cannot be expressed with words. I have tried but no cigar. ;)

    In all of my reading - I think the person that comes to mind for me - who wrote about such experiences in such an eloquent way, is Jane Goodall in her book A Reason For Hope. She even talks about reincarnation. :D
     
  13. Midnight.Sapphires

    Midnight.Sapphires Senior Registered

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    Profound moments...

    The only time I actually felt an incredible sense of peace and one-ness with the universe and within myself was when I lived in Colorado.

    I worked the graveyard shift - from 9:30 p.m to 6:00 a.m. It was during the winter months and when I left in the early hours of the morning, I would step out of the hospital, into a world so different from the daylight hours...I just can't describe my feeling. The world was dark and quiet and the stars were out. No sounds anywhere, some mornings there would be a full moon and the silver rays just bathed everything in a surreal glow. The pine trees were silhouetted against the mountains in the background and there was snow, sometimes gently falling, sometimes blizzard-like. I felt no fear, just an unusual calm and peace within me. I guess I could honestly say, I felt almost joyful, not because I had just finished my shift but...just because.

    I wrote once that the moonlight was a comfort to me...that I used to drag my blanket and pillow near to the window, just to sleep under it. Where I'm living now, it's not possible because of the way the flat is arranged and there are some nights when I look out the window on a full moon night and wish I was living someplace that would allow me this wee bit of comfort.
     
  14. rowan8

    rowan8 Senior Registered

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    I've always called my profound moments 'moments of awareness'/
    Because every time I experience them, I feel as if I had been blind, and scales had dropped off my eyes, and I could really see.

    Aware of oneness, aware that what is real isn't what is in front of me,but something more....I don't know. Deborah is right, these moments are very very difficult to verbalize. The feeling is indescribable.

    I've had many of those, through the years, and I count them as blessed moments in which I have been made aware of the complexity and simplicity of being. It's always bittersweet for me, and that moment seems to stretch on and on, and it transcends me in such a way, that I feel my connection to the universe in the most vivid way.

    The last time this happened to me was yesterday, actually, and it had been a while. I felt peace for the first time in a *long* time. :)
     
  15. kstornado11

    kstornado11 Senior Registered

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    Hi Tinkerman!!

    Wow...you gave me the goosebumps with that one! I know exactly how you feel... there's a lake near here, that is man-made, both of my late Grandfathers helped to build it, & one of them gave me some arrowheads he found there when I was a child... sometimes when I go there now, I SWEAR I can hear the drumbeats & voices of those that lived there... I need to do some research into the native americans who lived in this region & maybe learn a little more about who they were.
    As usual, your posts "get" to me!! Take care, neighbor! :thumbsup:
     
  16. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    I've read the thread a time or two in order understand the slight derailment. As Deborah said "words...aren't they great". How we interpret each other, how we see the world in relationship to each other is a major factor in our spiritual life.

    Yes I suppose one can classify "profound moments" as psychological, neuro-chemically induced but doesn't that some how negate our existence as advanced members of this world. Where in lies the actual beauty of a rose, its color, its smell, if it is labeled the simple result of pulsing chemicals and nerve receptors.

    I hate labels...I hate quantifying the unknown. I have an innate sense that there is more to this creation than tangible, physical, tactile things. I feel them deep down...I can't touch them FOR you, I can't "touch" them myself...but I love the art of attempting to find them...and then to describe them either in words or art. Expression is our way of interacting, consciously or not, with the universe and its unseen wonders.

    I see our lives as a journey of discovery...of accumulating spiritual wealth. I believe we're given free choice so as to discern for ourselves the path we follow. Some choose not to see beyond this world, and allow carnal/physical realities to "condition" their lives. AND that is not a bad thing. It really isn't! It is their free choice. The journey still goes on... and lessons are learned, and we will continue to progress towards that ultimate destination that I can not define for you.

    Meanwhile I smell the rose, not as a collection of fibrous chemicals, but as a representation of "something" wonderful. Profound moments are indeed mystical and defining.

    Peace Tman
     
  17. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Wonderful reflections TMan.
     
  18. jackh

    jackh Senior Registered

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    Thanks for uncovering this thread Deborah. I had such an experience too when I was backpacking in the Serria Mtns alone many years ago. I had just gotten started one morning and knew without a doubt that there was no one anywhere around me. As I walked along I started to here the most fantastic music coming from what sounded like a full scale orchestra. The tape players of the day were not capable of producing sound that good and I was puzzeled as to where it could be coming from. I walked forward and back and to both sides. The music was could only be heard in an area about 20 feet sq. I finialy stood still and just listen and felt such a wonderful peace and contentment with myself and the world. When it died out I kept walking.

    Jack
     
  19. aerialsinthesky

    aerialsinthesky New Member

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    That was beautiful!
     
  20. norabrindle

    norabrindle Senior Registered

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    Profound moments

    I will have to say that I have had a profound moment looking into my grand daughters face. She was standing on my lap and she smiled. The whole world and the room we were in and all my cares and worries fell into nothingness, and I was so thankful to be here at this place and time that I cried tears of love and joy. Although she is only 4 months old, she threw her little arms around my neck, slobbered on my face for a kiss and said "I love you" just as I say it. I can't wait for the stories that this child will tell me!
     
  21. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    I was chatting with Tinkerman last night and told him about my experience in Jamaica. He asked me to post it -- so here it is Tman, just for you ;)

    My best friend and I decided that we wanted to go to Jamaica for our Spring Break holiday. Her family had been visiting for 15 years, and knew many of the local people who lived and worked on the beach. We didn't want to stay in some fancy resort -- we wanted the full experience.

    We ended up renting a ramshackle cottage on the beach -- with no warm water, and cockroaches the size of your hand. The place was literally falling apart. There were three elderly sisters who rented it to us -- and they lived in the main house. They were -- the sweetest women ever. Many afternoons, we'd sit on their porch and listen to their stories of growing up in poverty.

    Not once -- did they complain they didn't have enough. The love between them was evident.

    We decided we wanted to "get away" from the beach and go up into the hills. We stopped in the market and filled our pockets with candy, bought bags of rice and headed out.

    Halfway up this huge hill we saw a little shack made of 5 boards, and this thin little man came out to greet us. He had the biggest smile I've ever seen. It didn't matter that half of his teeth were missing -- it was a beautiful smile -- straight from the heart. He invited us to sit with him -- and we did. (We actually knew his son Nyah. He worked on the beach in a jerk chicken stand) Pretty soon people were literally coming out of the bushes to join us.

    They walked for miles in barefeet, dressed in ragged clothing. There were little children hiding in the bushes. We could see them pointing at us and saying "whitey, whitey" and giggling amongst themselves. They had never seen a white person before.

    We decided -- this was exactly what we brought the rice for, and the elderly gentleman helped us cook it in a big pot over the fire. Others came, bringing beans, coconut milk and chicken. Our dinner party was in full swing.

    By now, the children had gotten used to us and had come out of hiding. They would touch us -- our hair, our freckles, our sunburns -- and giggle. We shared the candy we brought with them. One extremely adorable little boy -- a two-year-old named Dwayne literally attached himself to me. Everywhere I went, he followed. I held him on my lap all night long, until he fell asleep in my arms and his mother carried him home.

    After dinner, the children sang and danced for us. It was peaceful on the mountainside, sitting in the moonlight listening to the little ones sing -- their voices pure and joyful.

    I felt content and at peace. I had never seen people with so little -- give of themselves so freely, and with great joy. The love between them -- mothers, children, fathers, neighbors -- was something I had not seen in our society. It reminded me of other times -- simpler times -- when people truly cared about each other.

    It didn't matter that they lived 10 people to a shack, had torn clothes and little food. It didn't matter that they could not afford to send their children to school (in Jamaica they had to pay -- for school, for uniforms). They had so much more than most -- they had love, joy, a zest for life and an appreciation for everything.

    I learned a lot from those people in the short time I was with them. It is something -- I will never forget. I feel blessed -- for having met them.

    Ailish :)
     
  22. tiltjlp

    tiltjlp A Recycled Soul

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    What a beautiful story Aili. This goes a long way to illustrate that we can and do choose our own reality. It seems that any kind of life can be seen as good, based on your attitude.

    John
     
  23. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Bravo AiliRose....profound indeed! It will lend perspective to my Thanksgiving Day this week. Simple joy. Thank you.

    Tinkerman
     
  24. MoonDansyr

    MoonDansyr Senior Registered

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    Ailish~

    What a beautiful story! This reminds me of the conversations I've been having recently with the man who is teaching me woodworking. He is in his 80's (as is my father), and our conversations often turn to the depression era and money (or lack of).

    We (my little family) don't have much. Money is very tight, as I chose to quit my full-time job after my second child was born, to be a full-time mom. In the '50's and '60's, it was financially easier (even expected) for a mother to stay at home and raise the children. However, the economy is a bit different now. (I've attempted to return to work a few times, but it always somehow ends up costing us more.)

    Anyway, our discussions always go back to how money doesn't make a person rich. There's something great to be said for poverty. People learn how to stretch a dollar. They learn how use and reuse things. They become creative with what they've got. (I've come up with some awesome recipes by looking at my skanty cupboards and using creativity.) Rather than quickly throwing away something that's broken, they try to repair it; if it isn't reparable, maybe it can be used for something else! Instead of watching cable and playing video games, maybe the family will sit around and play games, dance to the radio, or even learn to play music together. Instead of paying to go to a high-priced amusement park, the family may pack a picnic lunch and go to a city park.

    There's just sooooo much to be said for how rich a poor person (or family) can be.

    I can see a really big difference between the girls and Daniel, as I was a single-working mother when Daniel was growing up and the girls have had my full attention. Daniel's a great kid, but life wasn't easy (for either of us) and I missed so much of his childhood that I really grieve for now. While I didn't have the choice at that time, now I'm glad that I do, regardless of how "poor" it makes us - - I feel pretty darned rich!
     
  25. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    Yes Moondansyr, I agree.

    I have travelled to Bali and in Cuba and the people there are often very poor, but always seem a whole lot happier and more smiling and relaxed and playful than the uptight Europeans who come there, covered in jewellery and dripping with expensive cameras and wearing uneccessarily expenisve shoes, stressed, complaining and anxious on the whole, even though they are on holidays and are supposedly relaxing.

    Love is what gives us joy, not shiny things. It would be nice if people would work this out. I think there is a connection of feelings of 'love' in the experiences others have described above, in addition to a proximity to a scene of natural beauty, water, peace and quiet and such.

    Twice I have been lucky enough to experience an overwhelming feeling of 'love' or 'God' (however you conceive her) or 'light' or the 'universe' or all of the above. It is like my spirit suddenly becomes aware that it is part of an enormous oneness, which encompasses absolutely everything - all the people, plants, tea cups, ants, galaxies, you name it - all pulsating and vibrating with an overwhelming and almost unbearable love all at once. There is no time, there is no space, there is only 'all that is'.

    Once it was when I was about 7 years old and just came over me in the school playground while I was having my lunch (alone as usual - I was considered a bit strange as a child and did not have many friends).

    The other time was when lying in bed meditating (as is my habit) to relax after the tribulations of a regular day. Suddenly - pow - glorious universal love. Most enjoyable sensation.

    It is an incredible feeling when it happens and life is never quite the same again. I have read descriptions of similar experiences in books by Indian mystics and gone - yeah I'm down with that feeling man! I dig where you are coming from.
     
  26. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    What a beautiful way of describing "the feeling", tanguerra. You have such an eloquent way of expressing things -- I always enjoy reading your posts. :)

    And I agree with you, MoonDansyr regarding "how money doesn't make a person rich." I am completely happy and content -- as long as I have a roof over my head and people to love, who love me. No gift could be greater than that. ;)

    Ailish
     
  27. MoonDansyr

    MoonDansyr Senior Registered

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    tanguerra~

    Amazing (at least to me) that you had that feeling at seven! I have experienced it, but I was somewhere in my 30's the first time. It is definitely a phenomenal "sensation" (so to speak).

    As for being poor - - it'd be nice to have money readily available when needed (like when the car breaks down, etc.), but to *live* like you're poor so that you truly value life. The thing is, it seems like when we begin to "prosper," that "hectic life" takes over and we become more "disposable" by paying others to feed us or entertain us, rather than doing it for ourselves. :(
     
  28. tanguerra

    tanguerra Moderator Emeritus

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    I guess it was a bit weird at that age. I did not really know what to make of it until I read about such things when I was older and thought 'Ah, so that's what that was'. But, I had been having 'memories' and various odd experiences from an early age, so it did not phase me particularly. I just assumed it was 'normal' and did not worry about it. It was a profoundly pleasant experience. I also recall realising around that age with a sort of shocked surprise - can't remember if slightly before or after the above experience - that everyone else probably had their own individual thoughts running around in their minds too, same as me - ie. that we are all individuals. I was probably more bowled over by that realisation than the other.

    Yes, as to wealth, I believe the answer lies in refining your definition of what is 'enough'. For many people 'enough' means 'more than the next guy' which is a source of a lot of trouble and inequity in the world, obviously.

    Enough for me is a secure roof, adequate clothing and sufficient food for myself and my family with a bit left over for a bit of fun now and again (but I am quite easily amused) and the occasional 'emergencies' which thankfully don't come up too often (touch wood). This is all I need to be happy and safe and leaves a lot more 'brain space' for more important matters. After that it is all 'shiny things' - jewellery, too many shoes, expensive cars, social status, .... Shiny things are fun, but in the end they don't really create genuine or lasting joy in one's life.

    I would not exchange my serenity and sufficient leisure time to spend doing things with my friends (or mooning about aimlessly on my own) for the stress required to accumulate enough wealth so that I could have a gold plated Rolex or holidays on the French Riviera or whatever. I am sure I could do that if I put my mind to it, but it does not interest me. Of course, there is always the lottery!
     
  29. traveler

    traveler Senior Registered

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    For me, the most profound moment in life was giving birth to my first child. I don't percieve labor in terms of pain, but in terms of the mental state I reached.

    As labor progressed, I had a greater and greater feeling of being "outside" myself somehow, like I was a part of every woman who had ever given birth. And I had a strong sensation of having done this before - birth is a universal reality for women, and I have birthed healthy babies in lifetimes past. As I squatted for my daughter to emerge, I felt a veil open and she came through. I sensed she was an old spirit, wiser than I am and I was intimidated at being chosen as her mother. That feeling passed over the next few hours as the veil closed and she was more firmly in her new body.

    I used no pain medication during birth, but I also did not find it unmanageable. In retrospect, I believe I reached a deep meditative state that I have not been able to reach through any other form of meditation. For me, those few hours of labor were a moment of illumination, like a little sparkle of enlightenment that lasted a brief time. I did not have these feelings during my second birth, that moment of transcendence was an experience specific to my first.
     
  30. Tinkerman

    Tinkerman Administrator Staff Member Super Moderator

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    Traveler thank you for sharing that wonderful story...profound for sure. I liked your description of the veil and thoughts on your child's soul. From the way I read your post, it seems you believed in reincarnation and the migration of souls prior to her birth. Is that right? And how did you come by it?

    Thanks again for your reply.
    Tinkerman
     

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