The Uncanny Case of Carl Eden

Discussion in 'Past Life Memories' started by Deborah, Oct 6, 2006.

  1. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Steve (SSAKE) mentioned The Uncanny Case of Carl Eden in a thread in the book section. It is an interesting case which I think deserves serious consideration. The article was published in 2002.

    What are your thoughts?

     
  2. tiltjlp

    tiltjlp A Recycled Soul

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    I've got to say that the two photos convinced me that this is a true case. With the mounting proof being offered, I'm amazed how many people still refuse to consider the reality of reincarnation. Thanks for the link Deborah.

    John
     
  3. Chansa

    Chansa Senior Registered

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    Thanks for the link ssake/Deborah. I second John. :) Wow, is the resemblance ever striking!

    Additionally, I think a strong element in this case illustrates why acknowledging children's potential past life memories in a non-judgmental and gentle way is very important, especially early on. Though his murder seems completely unrelated to any of this, I have to wonder if he hadn't been teased or brushed aside, if it would have affected the events that led to him dying in the same place he died during his previous life? Not entirely sure but it's awfully strange.
     
  4. BessieA

    BessieA Senior Registered

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    Thanks for the link Deborah. wow those photo's are amazing, they look so alike. It was an interesting story.
     
  5. Hammy

    Hammy Senior Registered

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    That's an incredible story, it's very good proof I feel for those who doubt reincarnation and the likeness in the photographs is just amazing.

    Gorgeous photo too BessieA ;) : angel
     
  6. MoonDansyr

    MoonDansyr Senior Registered

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    All of the coincidences are really amazing, as I'm not sure (maybe others can chime in), that all people share so many coincidences with their past lives.
     
  7. dark rosaleen

    dark rosaleen Senior Registered

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    If this story doesn't give you chills, what would? I wonder what the significance of his dying in the same place twice might be.
     
  8. Angelcat

    Angelcat Senior Registered

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    Hi Everyone, I have found some more information about the crash of this German plane in 1942:

    "At 5.30pm on 15th January 1942 a Dornier 217E-4 dropped two high explosive bombs on Skinningrove Steelworks then flew along the coast and swung into Teesmouth to drop a bomb on Eston Jetty causing slight damage. Within minutes the Dornier struck the cable of a barrage balloon flying at 4000 feet above the North Tees jetties which took a wing clean off causing the stricken craft to swing back round in a wide spiral over South Bank and back towards thr river which it didn't reach.

    It narrowly missed the Junction pub and crashed on the railway lines in a ball of flames. Ammunition in the aircraft started exploding in the flames and the noise could be heard as far away as the Hippodrome. The charred remains of three airmen were found nearby. They were removed and later buried in Thornaby Cemetery.

    The wreckage was hurriedly pushed to one side to reopen the railway lines - after all there was a war on! Gradually the wreckage was covered with slag and forgotten.

    The event hit the headlines fifty odd years later when clearing away the slag revealed the wreck of the plane and the remains of a fourth airman and he joined his comrades in Thornaby cemetery with military honours, enmities forgotten and forgiven. However a name tag in the remnants of his uniform ensured a macabre ending to the story as it was discovered that one of the crew had been buried under the wrong identity.

    Coincidentally, Jimmy Keir Adams (ex York Street and ex Albion Street) recalled the incident and said that he was one of the sightseers the next day. He was with Peter Pepper when Peter picked something up out of the dirt, thinking to get a souvenir. As he cleaned off the dirt he suddenly realised it was the palm of a hand with four fingers on it and dropped it in shock!
    Jimmy also remembered an Ack-ack gun placement being on top of the slag tip and during one hectic night (the same one?) they fired a shot which put a hole clean through a Cleveland Works chimney stack! It was repaired later but Jimmy said you could see the new brickwork patches (on both sides) for years after!!"

    And this cutting from The Times newspaper:

    Angelcat :)
     
  9. Chansa

    Chansa Senior Registered

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    The additional sources you provided really fortifies the existing information in this thread. Thanks so much for the update, Angel. :thumbsup:

    I am curious - where did you get the first half of your information?
     
  10. Angelcat

    Angelcat Senior Registered

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  11. Angelcat

    Angelcat Senior Registered

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    Here are some quotes from the book The Children That Time Forgot by Peter & Mary Harrison:

    "When young Carl Eden plays with his toy planes, his parents believe that it is not purely childish behaviour but is an action replay of the time when Carl remembers he was a pilot in the German Air force.

    "As soon as he could talk he used to tell us that he once crashed his plane into the windows of a building", says his mother, Valerie. “We gather that he eventually died from multiple injuries sustained in the crash. We thought it strange that he should say such a thing, for as a tiny toddler he never showed any real interest in adventure stories and he had no time for looking at war films or such things.

    Valerie Eden went on to explain that as he grew older and started to gain more command over his speech the story became more detailed and he told it in such a matter-of-fact way that she and her husband felt that they could no longer dismiss it out of hand as a little toddler’s day-dream.

    The incident which really persuaded the Edens that Carl’s story had a ring of truth to it occurred when Carl first learnt to draw and to colour. Like most small children he went through the stage of experimenting with his coloured pencils and crayons and he had the usual colouring-in books and children’s puzzle books in which he used to join up the dots to make a picture. One day he sat with his crayons and colouring-in book, but instead of colouring in the drawings, his mother noticed that he had drawn peculiar looking badges and motifs all over the page.

    The neatness of the drawing was the thing that most caught Valerie’s attention. Unlike the normal scribbles of a 3 yr old, Carl’s little drawings were definite precise examples of various badges and insignia which Valerie confesses were completely foreign to her, except for one little drawing. There on the top corner his colouring book Carl had drawn a perfect German swastika inside a circle, thus making it look like a badge. There were other small badges drawn with the expertise of a professional artist. When Valerie questioned her son about the badges he replied, “That’s the kind of badges I wore on my uniform when I used to drive my plane.”

    More surprises were in store when shortly after Carl’s 5th birthday he drew the cockpit of his plane. He remembered the exact positions of all the various controls and he explained to his bewildered parents the functions of each lever, dial and gauge. He even knew the location of the button which he remembers having to press in order to release the bombs.

    Carl’s father was intrigued with the amount of minute detail in his small son’s drawings, particularly as he knew that Carl had never ever been in a plane of any description and had certainly never been in a cockpit. “I don’t see how he could have got the information,” said his father, “He certainly couldn’t have got it from a picture book because we would have noticed, and in any case he did not possess any picture books containing German planes or cockpits.”

    The little boy can remember how he enlisted in the Luftwaffe, the German Air Force, when he was 19 years of age and he was stationed in a large air-force camp with a lot of huts in rows. Carl explains, “The huts had sinks in them, but no taps for the water. The water came out of a pump.” The boy recalls that he and his comrades were all trained in first aid and anyone who was injured was treated by the men themselves. All of them were called upon to perform this duty.

    Valerie and her husband were taken aback when their young son suddenly told them that he had been made to salute a framed picture of Hitler. “I couldn’t believe my ears,” said Valerie, “I had no idea that he ever knew, or had even heard of, the name of Hitler. It certainly was never a topic of conversation at home.”

    According to Carl, the troops were ordered to gather in a large assembly hall. He says, “There was a picture of Hitler on the wall and we all had to stamp our feet and salute to this picture.” He can demonstrate the stamp and the salute, which he executes as if they were second nature to him.

    In reply to his mothers question about what he wore when he was in the hall, he says, “Grey trousers tucked into knee-high leather boots and a black jacket.” His parents did not really believe that what their son described was a proper German uniform, so without telling their child they went along to their local library and looked up some books, only to find that Carl had given a perfectly correct description of his uniform, badges and the cockpit of his plane. His parents were able to check even the smallest details of Carl’s drawings against photographs which they found in an old book on German planes of the last war.

    Carl can reconstruct in chilling detail his crash into the windows of the building. He was flying low over some buildings and he must have lost consciousness for a few moments: as he described things, “It went all black for a moment.” When he came round in the cockpit of his plane he was aware of a building rushing towards him at great speed. He desperately wrenched at the controls in a frantic effort to avert the collision, but he was too late. The plane bulldozed its way right through the large glass windows of the building.
    Carl remembers the horrendous sensation which swept over him as he realized that he had lost his right leg. The shock of the crash and the loss of his limb, combined with his other injuries, affected him so severely that he died very shortly after the crash.

    See next message for the rest of this.

    Angelcat :)
     
  12. Angelcat

    Angelcat Senior Registered

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    Sadly the fatal blow affected not only Carl, but a pretty young fraulein from Carl’s village back in Germany, to whom he was engaged to be married. They had been childhood sweethearts and had grown up together, although she was several years younger than he. He remembered his thoughts just before he died and how he felt great compassion for his young fiancée, knowing that she would ultimately be given the shattering news of his death. In Carl’s typical understatement, “I felt so sorry for her.”

    Although Carl cannot recall much of what happened after he died, he is acutely aware of having had a younger brother who was also a pilot, and the strange thing is that he is convinced that this younger brother died shortly after he himself bled to death amongst the twisted debris of his wrecked plane. He has clear memories of his father in his previous life, whose name was Fritz. Carl seems to have been very fond of the man, who appears to have been a jovial character. Carl says of him, “He was so funny and always made me laugh, and he took me for nice walks in the woods.” He told Carl all about the trees and the flowers and plants that they would see on their rambles in the woods near their home in Germany. The village they lived in was picturesque, and nestled among hills and lush woodlands. “It was not a very big place,” says Carl, “But I liked it.”

    His mother was the disciplinarian of the family and Carl remembers her as being small and plump with dark curly hair and smallish glasses which she used to wear on the end of her nose. “She was a bit bossy,” says the boy, “And I always had to do what I was told.”

    He was made to do his share of the household tasks and he remembers that his regular chore was to gather the wood for the large open fires in their home. He has distinct memories of chopping up long tree trunks into small logs, then carting them home in his barrow to be stored as fuel. The smell of the newly chopped logs made a vivid impression on the young boy. He describes it as “a nice fresh smell which always reminds me of the woods.”

    Other smells which linger in Carl’s consciousness are those of cooking. He remembers how he used to be served a type of soup. “It wasn’t like the soup I get now,” he says, “It was a dark red colour and was quite thick. My mother made it nearly every day.” Then Carl added with a laugh, “I used to get other things to eat as well, only I can’t remember what the other things were like. But I know I got them as well as the soup.”

    Valerie Edon wonders if there could be any connection between Carl’s memories of his past life and other members of her family. She says, “My sister in law is German by birth and her father was a German pilot during the last war.” She wonders if it is only coincidence that this man was also killed in action, being brought down by the British while he was at the controls of his plane.

    While this sister in law was still a baby, her mother re-married an Englishman in Germany and then moved to England where the family have since settled. The baby was adopted by the English step father. Valerie muses over the possibility that by some strange twist of fate, she has given birth to the child who was really meant for her sister in law to bear. Valerie’s other two children, Darren and Angela, are completely different from their brother Carl. Both are well built with dark hair and tan complexions, whereas Carl is of a slight build with pale blond hair and white eyelashes.

    The Edons are still wondering why they felt compelled to call their little boy by the name of Carl. “It is a most incredible thing,” says Valerie, “Because we decided to call him Carl not knowing that he would have any connections with Germany.”

    At a visit to Carl’s school on a parents’ evening recently, Valerie spoke to Carl’s teacher who said, “He has strange eyes, and when I an talking to him about anything his eyes pierce straight through me.” The teacher went on to tell Valerie that if she gives Carl a sum to do, he gives her the correct answer in a flash. “When I ask him how he worked it out, he just doesn’t answer me. He seems to think that there is no need to bother working things out when he knows the answer already.”

    Carl, now an extremely bright 9 year old, has a perfectionist streak in him which belies his years. He is ultra precise in his manner, and is more than particular about his appearance and clothes. His mother takes great pains to have everything just so for him: the collars of his shirts must be beautifully ironed, and everything has to be scrupulously clean at all times. Could this possibly be a hangover from his strict military days?

    “We had a visitor in for tea recently,” laughed Valerie, “And Carl almost frightened the life out of her by solemnly describing in amazing detail all about Adolf Hitler, accompanied by goose steps and salutes.

    “As he gets older, though,” says Valerie, “Carl doesn’t say too much about his mysterious past life. It’s as though he only remembers the odd flash every now and then.” His mother has noticed that he is not particularly interested in watching war films on television but when he does he sometimes points out a mistake in the German uniform. Once he pointed to an actor playing a German NCO and said, “He is just like my sergeant.”

    Angelcat :)
     
  13. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    Wow, thank you for posting that, Angelcat! :thumbsup:
     
  14. hedpe9999

    hedpe9999 New Member

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    Does anybody know if Richter's father's name was Fritz? Also, didn't Carl mention the name of the town where he lived in Germany? Was it verified that Richter was from this town?
     
  15. Ailish

    Ailish Administrator Emerita

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    This is an interesting case. Do any new members have comments on the article?
     
  16. DashBlades

    DashBlades New Member

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    I think it's a true case, but the photos aren't as essential as most people consider them in my mind. I believe that I was at one point an arab. Now, I have red hair. I certainly look nothing like I did then haha.


    However, it does add more evidence.


    -Brian
     
  17. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    I agree with you Brian. I was Italian in my previous life - and a black woman the life before that. Very different features, and skin color. I think each individual is unique and some may return with extreme similarities - other not so much. ;)
     
  18. Pele

    Pele New Member

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    I knew a guy who firmly believed that he had been a German pilot who crashed to his death. In his current life the man had birth defects of his fingers & toes, with some missing & some half-formed. He felt that he was born so soon after his death in the PL that, in essence, his body had not had time to repair itself. I'm not sure if he also felt a sense of "punishment" about that PL as well.


    In his current life, he became an expert on WWII & Germany back then.
     
  19. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Since the link above no longer works - I am providing a copy of the original article here and a picture of Carl - 1999 - and 1942.


    [​IMG] Left: Carl Eldon, right: Heinrich Richter

     
  20. Alexnovo

    Alexnovo Senior Registered

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    Deborah,Thanks for repsoting this. It is an amazing story. I agree with an earlier comment. For me the photos are icing on the cake. The accounts of this man's childhood memories convince me that this is a very strong case, even if the two had not resembled each other in the slightest. When you then add the birthmark and the photographs to those memories, this case becomes extremely strong. I wonder if any further information has been developed and published out there. If anyone knows, I would love to see it.
     
  21. kemetic18

    kemetic18 Senior Registered

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    What an amazing case. Thanks for reposting this.:thumbsup:
     
  22. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    This is a very interesting case for those who are researching validations and want to see one families journey.
     
  23. Mama2HRB

    Mama2HRB Senior member

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    That is a great case, Deborah. Thank you for bringing that up. To me it seems like the soul stayed around where he died and then chose to be reborn there. I wonder if there was a reason for it, especially since he was German. Hmmmm ....
     
  24. kmatjhwy

    kmatjhwy Senior Member

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    Thanks for bringing this thread back up Deborah. What an interesting case and also what a striking similarity between the two.
     
  25. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    A great case worth looking into. For those who want to read about cases with validations.
     
  26. PhilipLaos

    PhilipLaos New Member

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    It is an amazing story, and I think I now know who bombed my primary school in our small seaside town before I was born. Our school was next to a large commercial laundry with a tall chimney making it look like an industrial factory.

    I worked at that steelworks many decades ago, and the railway line from there to Middlesbrough runs through my childhood home town - Saltburn by Sea, North Yorkshire.


    [​IMG]


    It seems they dropped their bombs on our school (intending to hit the 'factory') on their way to bomb the steelworks on the Tees.


    Our school had the remaining large area of missing classrooms throughout my primary school years, and we had to use porta-cabins as year 3 and 4 classrooms.


    Philip
     
  27. argonne1918

    argonne1918 Senior Registered

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    This was in the 1950's? I've read that Britain did not fully recover from the war until the mid 1960's. I also remember the periodic news stories about the German time-bombs being unearthed while digging foundations for new buildings. The time-bombs had mechanical timers set to explode days or weeks after being dropped. But many of the timers simply stopped working when the bombs hit the ground. The bombs were still "live" 20 and 30 years later. During the War single men in the military were "drafted" to be bomb defusers. They wore a microphone and had to tell step by step what they were doing to defuse the bomb. This was in case the bomb exploded the next person would know what NOT to do.
     
  28. Deborah

    Deborah Executive Director Staff Member

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    Post #19 quotes the article that no longer works in the link. The images of him then and now are there too.
     

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